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Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Ryan Poppe

A new project hopes to provide data-driven research to state agencies as they explore new solutions to enduring social and economic problems.

 

 


Ken Piorkowski / Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2zXBhaP

This week on "Texas Matters," we look at the death penalty.

Texas has executed 553 prisoners since capital punishment resumed in 1976, which is more than any other state. Over 11 years, Michelle Lyons watched 278 men and women take their last breath at the hands of the state.

Lyons joins us to discuss her experiences witnessing executions first as a newspaper reporter and then working for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in the book, “Death Row: The Final Minutes.”


Ryan Poppe

How Texas determines whether someone has the intellectual capacity to be sentenced to death is being examined by the nation’s highest court on Tuesday.  The Supreme Court made it clear no person with intellectual disabilities is to be executed but how Texas determines who fits that criteria is what is at stake this week.

In 1980, Bobby Moore was convicted for shooting a store clerk during a Houston robbery and later sentenced to die.  Moore’s IQ score ranges from 50 to 70 points, a person with average intelligence has an IQ score between 85 and 114.

Lokal_Profil / cc

AUSTIN — The identity of Texas’ lethal drug supplier would remain confidential under a measure the state House approved Monday — bringing it to the cusp of clearing the Legislature, despite advocates’ calls to lift the secrecy surrounding the drugs used for executions in the nation's busiest death chamber.

The bill would prohibit disclosure to the public and even to death row inmates and their attorneys. It sailed through the Texas Senate last week, then passed the lower chamber via a simple voice vote and without debate.

That means the proposal is just a legislative logistical step away from the desk of Gov. Greg Abbott, who is expected to sign it into law. An ongoing legal challenge already prohibits Texas from disclosing where the state buys execution drugs. That ruling came after manufacturers reported being threatened by death penalty opponents.

Courtesy Texas Department of Criminal Justice

HUNTSVILLE, Texas — A San Antonio man convicted of killing with the officer’s own gun in a struggle 14 years ago is headed for execution.

No last-day appeals were in the courts as the lethal injection of Manuel Garza Jr. scheduled for Wednesday evening approaches.

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