Tejano music | Texas Public Radio

Tejano music

Lydia Mendoza image: Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images. Historical marker credited to Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio.

Lydia Mendoza, known as “La Alondra de la Fronteras (The Lark of the Border),” would have turned 103 on May 31. She was honored the day after her birthday with a historical marker at her gravesite at San Fernando Catholic Cemetery No. 2 in San Antonio.


The Texas Historical Commission has recognized musician Lydia Mendoza as a significant contributor to Texas history by awarding her an official Texas History Marker.

Fernando Ortiz Jr. / Texas Public Radio

Selena fans have recently enjoyed a blossoming of memorabilia and media dedicated to the slain singer, and now there's one more item for their collection.

Cyle Perez / Texas Public Radio

The Tejano Conjunto Festival will offer more than live music selections this year. A particular piece of artwork will be at the center of the event.

courtesy Emilio Navaira IV

The San Antonio Symphony will soon do a show honoring one of the masters — but not one of the European ones. It’s a tribute to a local master, Emilio Navaira, and his son Diego Navaira thinks it’s a little strange.


From Texas Standard:

Ramón Hernández says Tejano music – which he describes as Texans performing Mexican music – has always been a part of his life. He grew up with it on the radio and then spent 35 years working with Tejano musicians as a publicist and journalist. Over the years, he began a collection of photos, sheet music, rare recordings, and other memorabilia and documents. Today, some of the most striking items in his huge archive are the costumes.

Ramiro Andrade. Courtesy Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center.

Tejano and conjunto are the soundtrack of San Antonio. Songs in these genres tell stories of every day life and a rich cultural history in South Texas. 


Jack Morgan / TPR Arts

There's a gathering of Tejano musicians up in San Marcos on Sunday, but there will probably be far more talk than music there. That's because they will be talking about the music — its backstory, its context, its value.

 

Former Express-News music writer Hector Saldaña will play host to a South-by-Southwest style panel discussion of Tejano music at the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University.

Emilio Navaira, a legend in the Tejano music scene, has died at 53.

Navaira was found unconscious at his home on Monday night, according to police in New Braunfels, Texas. Police say he appears to have died of natural causes.

Note: NPR's audio for First Listens comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.


Grupo Fantasma's raucous, good-time mix of funk, cumbia and soul emerged from the clubs of Austin at the start of the century, bringing with it a fresh sensibility for Tejano music. Now, the band faces a challenge: How do you make that great idea even better?

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