Technology & Entrepreneurship | Texas Public Radio

Technology & Entrepreneurship

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Technology and Entrepreneurship News Fund including The 80/20 Foundation, Digital Defense, Rackspace, The Elmendorf Family Fund, UTSA Center for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship, SecureLogix, USAA and Giles Design Bureau.

Anna Vasquez, second from left, served 13 years of a 15 year sentence for a crime that never happened.
Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The Houston City Council appointed Anna Vasquez on June 5 to the Houston Forensic Science Center’s board of directors. Vasquez was wrongfully convicted of a sex crime in 1998, and she served more than 13 years in prison along with three friends who are collectively known as the San Antonio Four. They were exonerated in December 2018.

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You can shed one of the scooter apps on your smartphone. The first electric scooter company will leave San Antonio after a year of increasing numbers — more than 16,000 dockless vehicle permits — leading to a cap along with forthcoming regulations and limits.

 


First American Financial

A massive data leak potentially revealed 885 million documents detailing private mortgage information last month, many including social security and bank account numbers.

Office of the Governor

Three of the five bills dealing with expanding broadband in Texas are either waiting on the governor’s desk or are already in effect. The results have proponents optimistic.

This story was updated 5.29.19 to reflect the final judgment of the court and comments from the plaintiff's lawyer. It was orginally published on 4.9.19, following the jury verdict.

Southwest Research Institute was fined $410,000 for firing a female employee in an act of retaliation because she filed sex discrimination complaints against the company. A jury found in favor of Mary Ellen Johnson — who was terminated after 12 years with SwRI — in the federal trial that began in San Antonio April 1.

A new generation of migrants is arriving in Mexico: young adults who were born in Mexico, raised in the United States and are now returning — some voluntarily, some by force — to the country of their birth. They've been dubbed "Generation 1.5."

With only limited support available from the Mexican government for these often well-educated returnees, several nongovernmental organizations and at least one private company are looking to help them out and take advantage of their skills.

wikicommons

A 60-year-old computer language powers the global economy.

 


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

The internet has become a necessity, and access is lacking in rural Texas.  At least 1.8 million Texans don't have broadband internet access. Estimates are as high as 80 percent of those without live in rural communities. This is part three of TPR's multi-part series: Connecting Rural Texas.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

1.8 million Texans lack broadband Internet access, and most of them live in rural Texas. Hundreds of millions of federal dollars could become available, but the government may not have an accurate picture of who has access and who doesn't. This is part two of a multi-part series focusing on Connecting Rural Texas. 

A San Antonio aerospace company that focuses on building rooms and seating for cargo planes triples in space and looks to double in size.

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