Sutherland Springs | Texas Public Radio

Sutherland Springs

Lynda Gonzalez / KUT

At home, loved ones are still waiting for survivors to be released from the hospital after the shooting at a Sutherland Springs church Sunday, killing 26 people.

 


Lynda Gonzalez / KUT

Effective preparation and immediate response are key factors when dealing with the aftermath of an emergency or mass casualty.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Texas Public Radio's David Martin Davies spoke with Texas Standard reporter Alain Stephens about how the Sutherland Springs shooter may have been able to obtain the guns he used to kill 26 people on Sunday. The incident is the deadliest mass shooting in Texas history. 


From Texas Standard:

At least a dozen of those killed in Sunday’s mass shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs were children, and some of them attended the school districts surrounding the small town.

Officials from local districts made the decision to go forward with classes on the Monday after the shooting, far from certain as to how many empty seats there might be in some classrooms, or how students might be affected by the trauma the whole area is experiencing.

Joey Palacios / TPR News

Updated 8 p.m., Nov. 12

The residents of Sutherland Springs are trying to mend wounds after dozens of people were killed or injured Sunday in the largest mass shooting in Texas history.

 


In the wake of the massacre at a small-town Texas church on Sunday, many people are asking why.

A large portion of the mass shootings in the U.S. in recent years have roots in domestic violence against partners and family members. Depending on how you count, it could be upwards of 50 percent.

The Sutherland Springs, Texas, resident who exchanged gunfire with the suspect in Sunday's mass shooting at a church insists he is not a hero, saying that he was "scared to death" during the encounter.

"I think my God, my Lord protected me and gave me the skills to do what needed to be done," Stephen Willeford, a former National Rifle Association instructor, tells KHBS/KHOG television in Arkansas.

From Texas Standard:

A lone gunman killed 26 people and injured dozens more during a Sunday service at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. A few miles down the road in the small town of Stockdale, pastors are looking for ways to comfort their congregations: parishioners who are not only grieving for their neighbors, but who may also be concerned that their “sanctuary” is not immune to these horrific events.

From Texas Standard.

Several news outlets have reported that Devin Patrick Kelley, the suspect in a deadly mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, bought the weapon used in the attack from an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in San Antonio. Given Kelley’s history of domestic violence, some are saying he shouldn’t have been allowed to buy a firearm in the first place.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

The Air Force says a mistake allowed Devin Patrick Kelley to buy guns. On Sunday Kelley opened fire on a small church in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

The former airman had an assault-style rifle and two handguns — all purchased by him, according to federal officials — when he shot and killed 26 people.

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