Sutherland Springs | Texas Public Radio

Sutherland Springs

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Funerals continue for the more than two dozen people killed in a mass shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs.


David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

On November 5, a peaceful Sunday morning church service became the scene of a targeted mass shooting in the small town of Sutherland Springs, about 30 miles east of San Antonio. 

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

One week after the mass shooting at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, the congregation gathered for its Sunday service to mourn the loss of the 26 lives while also celebrating the faith that brings them together.


Members of the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas held their first Sunday service following last Sunday's mass shooting there.

In an emotional sermon, Pastor Frank Pomeroy spoke of the 26 killed on Nov. 5., including his 14-year-old daughter, invoking a sense of both personal and communal loss.

"I know everyone who gave their life that day. Some of whom where my best friends and my daughter. I guarantee they are dancing with Jesus today," said Pomeroy, according to the Associated Press.

In the middle of the showroom at Trey Ganem Designs is a small casket on a rolling cart. It's not yet fully assembled, but it is painted a dazzling, sparkling pink.

The casket is for a little girl – one of the 26 lives lost in Sunday's massacre at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

"Her dad just said, 'That's my princess,' " Trey Ganem says, so Ganem is building her a princess casket to be laid to rest.

Family Photo / Date unknown

First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs is more than a church for many residents: It’s a place many marked life’s major events. That was the case for Lagena Garcia, who lives just a block away from the church.


From Texas Standard:

It is impossible to calculate the loss suffered by the survivors of the shooting at Sutherland Springs. Even if victims tried to sue for damages, the most obviously culpable person – the shooter – is dead. That’s often the case at the end of such tragedies.

The pastor of the Texas church that was the site of a deadly shooting rampage this week says the bullet-riddled structure will be demolished because it is too stark of a reminder of the massacre.

Pastor Frank Pomeroy, whose 14-year-old daughter, Annabelle, was among the victims, told the Southern Baptist Convention on Thursday that he plans to have the church razed.

"There's too many that do not want to go back in there," Pomeroy told The Wall Street Journal.

Lynda Gonzalez / KUT

This story was updated 12:15 p.m.

On a field that’s normally the sight of Friday night football games, family members of Sutherland Springs shooting victims were embraced by music, and words of support from Vice President Mike Pence and Texas Governor Greg Abbott.

 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

At least 26 people are dead after a mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, about 40 miles southeast of San Antonio.

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