Standardized Testing | Texas Public Radio

Standardized Testing

Students walk across the Trinity University campus on Feb. 6, 2018.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Trinity University in San Antonio is launching a test-optional admissions policy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students will have the option to apply to the college without submitting an ACT or SAT score for the next three years, beginning with the Fall 2021 semester.

Penn State via flickr | http://bit.ly/2WWyMjy

Research showing that reading passages on Texas standardized tests were years above grade level inspired calls for action this legislative session.

Lawmakers responded by passing a bill to study the matter further.


Photo by it's me neosiam from Pexels CC0: http://bit.ly/2UDa4U7

On Tuesday, Texas students will begin taking the state's standardized test – known as STAAR – amid renewed criticism about its ability to accurately and fairly measure academic performance. 

Wes Scalf, 13, speaks to his mom, Lisa Scalf, in their home in February 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As the first wave of Texas students sit down to take the state standardized test this week, many parents, educators and lawmakers are wondering whether those tests are fair. Some are convinced the answer to that question is no.

Why The STAAR Test May Be Setting Students Up To Fail

Feb 22, 2019

From Texas Standard:

From botched distribution of exams to concerns about so-called teaching to the test, educators and parents alike have been critical of the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR, standardized tests since their rollout in 2012. And over the past few years, something unusual has been happening: students who are otherwise successful in the classroom are failing the exams.

Should Texas Eliminate The High-Stakes STAAR Test?

Jan 22, 2019

From Texas Standard:

Stakes can be high for students and teachers in Texas when it comes to standardized testing – specifically, STAAR testing. Students usually need to pass to advance to the next grade, and eventually, to graduate. Families, teachers and teacher groups have been vocal in the past about how stressful the tests can be. They're concerned that spending the entire school year on preparing for the STAAR takes away from other learning opportunities.

Now, a Republican lawmaker has filed a bill in the House that would repeal STAAR testing.

Public Domain/Pixabay http://bit.ly/2HbskxX

Most of the 5 million students enrolled in Texas public schools are taking state-required standardized tests this week. 


The Texas Education Agency is penalizing the New Jersey-based company that develops and administers the state's controversial STAAR tests to the tune of $20.7 million — over widespread logistical and technical issues reported with the spring administration, Education Commissioner Mike Morath announced Tuesday.

The problems caused thousands of students to lose answers to online standardized tests.

Judge Denies State's Request to Toss STAAR Suit

Aug 23, 2016
Photo illustration by Todd Wiseman / The Texas Tribune

After a group of parents sued the Texas Education Agency over the 2016 administration of STAAR exams, state lawyers argued this summer that the parents had no standing and asked the courts to drop the case.

This week, the first day of school for many Texas children, Travis County District Court Judge Stephen Yelenosky denied their request in a one-page order with no further explanation.

Summer School a Tossup After Testing Mishaps

Jul 14, 2016

When Education Commissioner Mike Morath announced last month that the state would all but scrap the results of problem-plagued standardized tests for 5th and 8th graders, parents of students who hadn’t passed the exams were left scrambling to figure out what it meant for their children.

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