The Source | Texas Public Radio

The Source

Dallas Williams / Texas Public Radio

Texas already had the nation's highest uninsured rate pre-pandemic and the gap is expected to widen much further in its wake. The outbreak leveled the U.S. economy and caused massive layoffs, costing people not only their jobs but also their employer-sponsored health care coverage.


Shelter-in-place orders and distancing guidelines have kept COVID-19 case numbers at a manageable level so far, but the threat of community transmission is still very real.


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The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted many important milestones, including traditional graduations. Instead of walking the stage in a stadium or auditorium filled to the brim with friends and family, 2020 graduates are attending virtual, curbside and limited attendance ceremonies and celebrations.

 


At least 2.6 million Texans filed for unemployment from March 15-May 15 due to widespread layoffs and furloughs caused by protective measures to slow the spread of COVID-19, according to the state's unemployment office.


The next phase of Gov. Abbott's plan to restart the economy includes reopening Texas' approximately 5,500 bars, taverns and nightclubs at 25% capacity this Friday


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

An eviction moratorium for non-federally protected properties expires May 18 in Texas, putting tenants who are unable to pay rent due to COVID-related job losses at risk of being kicked out. More than 1.9 million Texans filed for unemployment March 15-May 9.


More than 40% of Texas' and 30% of U.S. coronavirus-related deaths have been residents or staff members at long-term elder care facilities. 


At first it seemed the global pandemic could be a unifying moment; a universal experience to bring us all together. But with each passing week, the virus is less of a common enemy and more of a magnifying glass for existing inequalities and partisan divides.


The coronavirus pandemic is causing disruptions to food and agriculture supply chains around the world, including in Texas. 


The coronavirus pandemic has many Texans worried about voting in person in the state's mid-July primary runoff election. Mail-in voting could be a gamechanger, especially in a public health crisis -- why is it so controversial? What are the pros and cons of expanding access to absentee voting?


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