Sexual Assault | Texas Public Radio

Sexual Assault

Young women who are sexually assaulted are vastly unlikely to report those crimes to police, according to a newly released Justice Department report.

Even more striking, women ages 18 to 24 who are in college or trade school are less likely to report such incidents than those who aren't in school, despite the increasing number of sexual assault advocates and counselors on campus in recent years.

Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras: The attention paid to rape on college campuses has brought fraternity culture under a microscope. Some universities, and even some Greeks, are starting to confront sexual assault related to fraternity life. A journalist has been trekking the length of the entire Rio Grande in an attempt to get people to pay attention to the disappearing river. He hopes the journey will spur a serious discussion about rescuing a river that provides water to millions of people in two countries. As Mexico works to reform its energy industry, cartels are branching into fuel theft. Also, "inaugural poet" Richard Blanco talks about his memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos."

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At least two "high-risk," violent sex offenders in Texas were ordered out of the state after being released from jail in 2004. The states the offenders were respectively ordered to were not given notice of their status, and the men found new victims.

The discovery, revealed in a Houston Chronicle investigation, shocked many and has many questioning the legality and constitutionality of the act. 

It's sometimes called "the red zone" — from the first day on campus to Thanksgiving break — when female students are thought to be at higher risk of sexual assault.

Students away from home for the first time with no parental supervision are trying to make friends and fit in. Add parties and alcohol, and it can be a dangerous mix.

"It's assumed the highest-risk period is at the beginning of the first semester," says Bill Flack, an associate professor of psychology at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania.

There's no question that alcohol is a factor in the majority of sexual assaults on campus. And alcohol is abundant and very present at most colleges today.

In fact, federal health officials say more than 80 percent of college students drink. And about half say they binge drink. This means more than four drinks for women and more than five drinks for men, within a two-hour time frame.

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The Office of Violent Sex Offender Management is a mess says its new director. From a woeful work environment to a lack of basic managerial oversight, critics are lambasting the program.  The program is tasked with overseeing the civil commitments of the worst sex offenders who have served their time but remain a risk.

Aidan Wakely-Mulroney / http://bit.ly/1g8MwrF

An estimated one in five women are sexually assaulted on college campuses across the country, according to Vice President Joe Biden and the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. While the numbers themselves have been questioned, the issue of campus sexual assault is a real one claiming too many victims. 

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  Last week "Grits For Breakfast" published the report from the state's prison consultants, The Moss Group, on what implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) would have meant for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

The Bexar County Sheriff’s Office is applying for a federal grant under a new law designed to prevent sexual assault in jails.

The grant could provide the county with as much as $250-thousand dollars to help the jail maintain new federal standards.

Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in May of 2012, and it includes provisions to prevent, detect, and respond to allegations of sexual abuse in any kind of detention facility.

Young women are often the targets of aggression when they're out in bars, but the problem isn't that guys are too drunk to know better.

Instead, men are preying on women who have had too much to drink.

When researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of Washington observed young people's behavior in bars, they found that the man's aggressiveness didn't match his level of intoxication. There was no relationship.

Instead, men targeted women who were intoxicated.

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