Science | Texas Public Radio

Science

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The foundation of science is tested, repeatable experiments with good data.

When people lie in science, fabricate data, the peer-review process is supposed to keep fraudsters from publishing. But as science expands it becomes more complex and the number of journals flourishes.

As a result of being treated as a business, a number of high-profile frauds are occurring, and sometimes the journals themselves are complicit.

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Last week the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a fifth report on climate change and how to reduce it. The panel, which was set up in 1988 to assess the science related to climate change and propose solutions, is clear: Climate change is occurring right now and humans are the cause.

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The Texas Freedom Network say book review teams for the State Board of Education are pressuring publishing companies to change how climate change and evolution are presented in next year’s biology textbooks.

The SBOE set up several groups to review different textbooks and this week their comments and suggested changes have been made public.

Texas Freedom Network's Executive Director Kathy Miller said they suspected that the review teams would go after evolution and climate change.

Director Scott Thurman

A political nonprofit has filed a petition with the state alleging that creationists on the State Board of Education are planning to adopt textbooks that discount the theory of evolution.

Creationists believe that everything on Earth and in the universe was created by a supreme being.

Chris Eudaily | Texas Public Radio

In the first segment:

The low-information voter: The often-complained-about citizen who knows when voting day is, but not enough to make a sound decision on the issues, or candidates.

At least that is what the people who lose think.

This term is often thrown around when "people vote against their interest" or "the media frames an issue in a way to mislead."  

United States Congress

In the next congress, Republican Lamar Smith will be giving up his powerful chairmanship on the House Judicial Committee to become chair of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

Smith will lead the committee that has oversight over NASA and other Texas research institutions.

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