school lunch | Texas Public Radio

school lunch

Margaret Soto hands a lunch sack to a child.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The coronavirus outbreak has upended daily life and put livelihoods at risk.

Amid that uncertainty, families who rely on free and reduced-price meals were able to pick up free breakfast and lunch at schools across Bexar County on Monday, the first day schools were closed to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Students eat lunch at Castle Hills Elementary in San Antonio's North East school district Jan. 17, 2020.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

An anonymous donor paid the school cafeteria debt for almost a thousand students in the North East Independent School District last week.

Updated at 9:45 p.m.

Former first lady Michelle Obama might find some of the latest actions by the Trump administration pretty difficult to stomach.

On Monday newly minted Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced a rollback of school lunch standards championed by the former first lady, declaring at a Virginia school that the administration would "Make School Meals Great Again."

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Cynthia Barton is the dietitian for the Northside Independent School District—San Antonio’s largest. She's one of 7,000 school lunch professionals who were in San Antonio this week for the School Nutrition Association's annual conference. 

“I’ve been with Northside for 24 years, so I’ve seen a lot of change,” Barton says. 

One of the biggest changes was the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act—new federal nutrition standards mandating healthier school lunches. It meant more grains and veggies and fewer calories on the school lunch menus.