San Antonio International Piano Competition | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio International Piano Competition

Nathan Cone / TPR

The San Antonio International Piano Competition is more than their every-three-years contest; in between the big event, they hold recitals and sponsor young artists to encourage the appreciation of piano music and repertoire. Younggun Kim, who received special recognition at the 2012 competition, was in San Antonio on February 25, 2017 for a recital on the University of the Incarnate Word campus that dazzled the audience.

At this year’s San Antonio International Piano Competition, the five finalists were able to choose the repertoire they felt would best showcase their talents, but there was one piece they *had* to play, by Matthew Mason.

SAIPC

UPDATE, June 20: The winners of this year's San Antonio International Piano Competition are:

  • Gold Medalist: Scott Cuellar
  • Silver Medalist: Sung Chang
  • Bronze Medalist: Osip Nikoforov

Congratulations to the winners!

The video at the bottom of this page now links to the final round of competition.

UPDATE, 9:45 p.m. Thursday: Five competitors have advanced to the final round for the 2016 San Antonio International Piano Competition. They are:

Courtesy Yupeng Gu

A former Bronze Medal winner in the San Antonio International Piano Competition is returning  to San Antonio for a performance soon, and she’s coming from South Korea.

“On February 21st San Antonio International Piano Competition will be presenting Yejin Noh in recital.”

Terence Frazor is the Competition’s Executive Vice President. Ms. Noh competed here three years ago.

An internationally-renown pianist returns soon to the Alamo City. I asked Eduardo Delgado about his upcoming appearance here.

"Well I’m very excited about it because the first time I went to San Antonio I was a judge of the competition,” he said.

He was here as a San Antonio International Piano Competition judge.  

“We had a wonderful time and we listened to wonderful talents,” said Delgado.

Every three years the piano competition brings young talent together for a rigorous competition. On this visit though, Delgado has a different focus.

SAIPC

The four finalists are doing all they can to impress the judges and make their mark on this special occasion. There is the award-winning performance of the commissioned work "Upsparkles" by the Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Moravec.

Russian mystic Alexander Scriabin breaks free from 'sonata-form' with his "Sonata Fantasy in g minor."

Claude Debussy cuts loose from the forms he used in his first set of preludes when one of the contestants plays four of the twelve works from his second set from 1913.

SAIPC

It is nerve racking to compete head to head. In sports this is a fairly normal part of the job, but when it comes to artists, especially pianists, it is a big shift from the norm.

A musician's routine is quiet and predicable. You generally practice alone and it is here that you polish and learn, working on your fingering, phrasing and the little things that mean so much to you, but might not be even noticed by an audience.

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I remember reading a legendary performer once say that no two performances are alike. When I starting studying the piano I recorded some of my practice sessions to hear how I was playing without the distraction of making the music.

The great musician was right, not only were all my repetitions different, I couldn't make my performances sound the same if I tried.

Wikipedia

In the hurly-burly of a Piano competition there are selections that can make or break the chances of a competitor; pieces so difficult or dense that only a master musician can make them work for the audience and more importantly, the judges.

On the Piano this Sunday, we continue with music from the 2012 San Antonio International Piano Competition where two of the pianists "go big" in an effort to convince the judges that they have what it takes to be worthy of the gold medal.

Debussy

all-music-sheets.com

Over the years of listening to the San Antonio International Piano Competition, I've noticed that nerves play an important part. Just enough, and a performance can be charged with excitement, too much, and disaster awaits.

With the competitors narrowed from 11 to eight, the stakes are higher, and that could help the judges separate the best as the competition continues.

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