San Antonio History | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio History

Three hundred years ago, San Antonio was a military outpost called the New World — a place that was far away, unexplored and uncertain. Char Miller, a W. M Keck professor of environmental analysis at Pomona College in Claremont California and author of "San Antonio A Tricentennial History," joins us to discuss the Alamo City's past on this "Texas Matters."


From Texas Standard:

It’s inevitable that some of the institutions we rely on today won't be used in the future. Consider the manual typewriter or the milkman ... or the town crier.

Texas Standard's Micheal Marks spoke with Maria Pfeiffer, a local historian in San Antonio, who told him the last town crier in the U.S. was Julius Myers, and he held his position until 1928.

Natalie Krebs

On Fronteras:

  • Residents of a poor El Paso neighborhood accuse a school district of environmental discrimination over a proposed bus hub (0:17).
  • A struggling Dallas high school turns itself around through the efforts of a new principal (8:52).
  • A religious order of sisters opened the first Catholic church and school for African-Americans in San Antonio 125 years ago (14:40).


CBS News

It was 50 years ago that a documentary exposed the conditions on the San Antonio Westside that shocked the nation.

America saw disturbing images of extreme poverty and malnutrition that was common in San Antonio.

Half a century later the CBS program “Hunger in America” continues to resonate in San Antonio.