Rio Grande Valley | Texas Public Radio

Rio Grande Valley

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has sent letters to 67 Rio Grande Valley landowners, requesting permission to survey their land as a possible site for a border wall. But congressional leaders believe that it could be decades before any work begins.


Carson Frame / TPR News

It’s been just over a week since the governors of Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California committed to sending around 2,000 National Guard members to the U.S.-Mexico border.

That’s in response to a call to action by President Trump, who says there’s been an uptick in illegal border crossings and drug trafficking.

Some 900 troops have already arrived, but operations are not yet fully underway.


From Texas Standard.

You can squeeze a lot into a spending proposal that’s 2,200 pages long and $1.3 trillion deep. But if you look at the fine print in the spending deal passed by Congress and signed by the president late Friday, you may notice something big in there when it comes to Texas – $1.6 billion in new border security infrastructure.

David Martin Davies

As the Trump administration plans for a border wall, many residents in the Rio Grande Valley are concerned about what that means for areas on the other side of the barrier, including ecologically sensitive and historically significant land.

From Texas Standard:

Selene Moreno is a senior at Benito Juarez-Abraham Lincoln High School in La Joya, Texas. She says she’s looking forward to graduation.

“I’m planning to become a physical therapist after I graduate from high school and I’m planning on going to Texas A&M,” Moreno says.

On this Labor Day, a look back to 50 years ago – a labor fight, a strike and a legendary march for better wages, improved working conditions and human dignity for farm workers.

On June 1, 1966, farm workers in Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley, virtually all of them Latino, left the melon fields.

They did the unimaginable and went on strike.

They were demanding a $25 dollar-an-hour wage, and improved working conditions, including clean drinking water.

Daniela Pastrana/IPS / Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/9cMmiv

·         Mexican Journalist Marcela Turati takes risks reporting on the drug wars.

·         North Texas resident Lindsay Diaz was underinsured when a tornado hit.  That’s made rebuilding more difficult.

·         A nature trail brings relief to a distressed New Mexico neighborhood.

·         Houston Symphony Orchestra members are helping bilingual students adapt English words through music.

John Burnett / NPR

This week on Fronteras:

•          A federal task force has moved into the Rio Grande Valley to investigate long-standing political corruption. 

•          NPR’s John Burnett talks to Texas Public Radio about the origins of the federal corruption probe, including concerns that businesses will not bring economic development to the region as long as the corruption is so widespread.

•          Teens living on both sides of the border near San Diego are tackling issues affected young Hispanics, including high school dropout rates and unemployment.

This week, NPR examines public corruption in South Texas. The FBI has launched a task force to clean up entrenched wrongdoing by public servants in the Rio Grande Valley. In the final part of this series, we examine vote-stealing and election fraud.

Pages