Rick Perry | Texas Public Radio

Rick Perry

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Texas Matters first hit the airwaves on Texas Public Radio on Sept. 1, 2000. And each week since Yvette Benavides (my creative partner and wife) and I have produced stories, interviews and commentaries for public radio listeners across Texas.


Among the key figures embroiled in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump is Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who announced last week that he will be resigning later this year.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

Secretary of Energy Rick Perry plans to leave his position at the end of the year, President Trump confirmed to reporters Thursday in Fort Worth, Texas. Trump praised Perry and said he already has a replacement in mind.

"Rick has done a fantastic job," Trump said. "But it was time."

Trump said that Perry's resignation didn't come as a surprise and that he has considered leaving for six months because "he's got some very big plans."

From Texas Standard:

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, who President Donald Trump's nominated for Veterans' Affairs Secretary, has withdrawn his name from consideration, following allegations of misconduct during his tenure as White House physician. And embattled EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is testifying on Capitol Hill Thursday, answering questions about his spending on travel, security and furnishings, since taking office. But while Pruitt is only one of several Trump cabinet members facing scrutiny, Energy Secretary, and former Texas Gov. Rick Perry has remained largely out of negative headlines. And Perry's name has been floated as a potential replacement nominee at Veterans' Affairs.

 

Carson Frame / TPR News

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry stopped by Brooke Army Medical Center Friday to tour several of its rehab facilities and speak to veterans. Perry's visit fueled rumors that he may be President Trump's choice to replace Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, who has come under fire in recent weeks for his travel expenditures.

But Perry denied he'd been tapped for the position.

Former Gov. Perry Questions Legitimacy Of Texas A&M Student Body Election

Mar 23, 2017
REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Editor's note: This story has been updated with comment from a Texas A&M University administrator.

Former Gov. Rick Perry, now the U.S. energy secretary, is questioning the legitimacy of the election that gave his alma mater its first openly gay student body president

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s Senate confirmation as U.S. Energy secretary is getting positive reviews from Texas Republicans, but environmentalists from his home state say the appointment is a mixed bag.

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is now the 14th U.S. Secretary of Energy, despite having once pledged to eliminate the Department of Energy.

Or at least, he tried to pledge to eliminate the department — including once when he couldn't think of its name.

Perry was confirmed Thursday by the Senate in a 62-37 vote.

Former Gov. Rick Perry faces a confirmation vote in the Senate on Tuesday for his nomination to lead the U.S. Department of Energy. Among all the questions Perry’s appointment has raised, one that’s gotten little scrutiny is what it might mean for natural gas prices.

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry has a confirmation hearing Thursday to become the next secretary of the energy department, which Perry, in a 2012 Republican presidential debate, blanked at remembering was one of the three federal agencies he’d pledged to abolish.

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