rain | Texas Public Radio

rain

A National Weather Service radar showing rainfall for the morning of June 23, 2020.
National Weather Service

The National Weather Service reported 1 to 2 inches of rain fell across South Central Texas on Tuesday morning. 

SuSanA Secretariat / Wikimedia Commons

Declining aquifer levels and the rapidly rising cost of water supply and management has prompted suppliers, builders, and homeowners across the region to turn to alternative sources of water. As we look to a long-term future of increasing population growth and demand on groundwater resources, how can individuals, businesses, and cities create sustainable water supply in innovative ways? How can we incentivize water independence and conservation? 

Wikimedia Commons

San Antonio entered Stage 1 water restrictions on July 14th. That's the first water rationing to occur in two years. But this morning's heavy rains and thunderstorms may help delay the onset of Stage 2. 

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation

DALLAS — Rains that swept through North Texas has caused flooding that closed some roads, seeped into some homes and caused the collapse of a rural bridge under a truck carrying a family.

Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Kyle Bradford said that about 2:30 p.m. Sunday, the South Sulphur River collapsed as a truck carrying a family was crossing. A Good Samaritan threw the family a rope, and they managed to climb back up the road. Bradford says no one was injured.

National Weather Service meteorologist Ted Ryan told The Associated Press that 3 to 6 inches of rain fell across the already-saturated area Sunday.

Remnants Of Bill Move Just West Of I-35, Heavy Rain Ahead, Tornado Watch On

Jun 17, 2015
National Weather Service

SAN ANTONIO — Flood-weary Texans were bracing for heavy rain and possible flooding as the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill crept further inland early Wednesday.

The center of the storm was expected to move northward just west of the Interstate 35 corridor, dropping 4 to 5 inches of rain on areas of Central Texas, still cleaning up and recovering from Memorial Day weekend floods that left 14 dead and two missing along the Blanco River alone in Blanco and Hays counties.

The National Hurricane Center said early Wednesday the storm was about 45 miles south of Waco and moving north at about 13 mph. Flash flood watches and warnings were in effect for the area, and Gov. Greg Abbott was expected to receive a briefing from state emergency officials Wednesday morning in Austin.

Courtesy: National Weather Service

UPDATE, 1:30 p.m.:

The eye of Tropical Storm Bill is currently near Victoria, Texas,  after making landfall at Matagorda Bay. National Weather Service Meteorologist Aaron Treadway told TPR News Bill will lose some power by the time it makes its way to San Antonio and Central Texas.  

“By the time [the eye] gets up here it will be a tropical depression. As we get closer to that circulation it will be more of a constant rain as that circulation moves from the coast north through the state of Texas,” he said. 

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation / via Facebook

SAN MARCOS — Recordings of 911 calls reveal frantic requests for help from people staying in homes along the flooded Blanco River in Central Texas, including a woman who said the house she was in was “floating.”

Hays County released the recordings Tuesday to the Austin American-Statesman. The calls came in over Memorial Day weekend, when the area saw heavy rains and massive flooding. Nine bodies have been recovered in Hays County. The victims include Laura McComb, 34, who called to report water was creeping higher and there was no way to escape.

“We are on the Blanco River in Wimberley, and the water is up to the second story into the house,” McComb said. “It’s coming up to the second floor. I mean it’s so high up. And we have no exit out.”

Recent Rains Bring More Than Floods: Watch For Snakes, Wildfires, West Nile Virus

Jun 4, 2015
Ltshears / CC

FORT WORTH — Buster Tuggle was atop his house, reaching into the long branches of a cottonwood with a trimmer, unaware of a water moccasin wrapped around a nearby branch.

Tuggle, 61, owner of Hare’s Nursery in Arlington, also didn’t see the snake when he sawed it in two, along with an armful of tree limbs. His sister Joyce was the first to see it when it smacked on the ground next to her.

“His head was attached to the end I was at, and he was still trying to bite,” Joyce, who quickly grabbed a hoe to finish off the intruder, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Courtesy: The Texas Department of Transportation / via Facebook

SAN MARCOS — Authorities have identified another victim of the deadly flooding along the Blanco River in Central Texas. Medical and dental records were used to identify 81-year-old Kenneth Reissig, whose body was found Thursday close to the river near the line separating Blanco and Hays counties.

The circumstances that led to Reissig’s death were not immediately clear.

Officials said Tuesday that eight bodies have now been recovered in the area following the catastrophic flooding that swept through Memorial Day weekend.

This Sunday, 150 girls ages six to 16 will say goodbye to their parents, grab their trunks and move into their summer cabins at Rocky River Ranch. The 50-year-old camp is a place preserved in time. When alumni drop off their little sisters and daughters, director Shanna Watson asks them if anything looks different.

Pages