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MONDAY at noon on "The Source" — Thousands of acres of former coal mining land in Texas could be contaminated because of the state's lax enforcement of industry requirements.

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San Antonio City Council recently approved revisions to the city’s controversial sick leave ordinance, which will affect close to 354,000 workers. Regardless of size, all businesses operating within city limits will be required to offer sick time to their employees as of December 1.


The above map is based on data from the San Antonio Fire Department. They began collecting data on Sept. 25, 2018. It is current to June 10, 2019. They began tracking time of incident in the dataset in mid December.

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UT Health San Antonio surgeon Donald Jenkins supports gun rights. The San Antonio surgeon is among the gun-owning doctors who has signed on to a new set of gun-safety recommendations.


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The Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs and Border Security convened at Port San Antonio Wednesday to hear public comment on issues ranging from defense manufacturing to military youth readiness.

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently began notifying teen pregnancy institutions that their federal funds are being cut to the tune of about $200 million.

Many of these programs were awarded five-year grants during the Obama administration but now, they are told one year of funding remains.

Texas has the highest number of teen parents in the nation and the state has the fifth highest rate of teen pregnancy. Texas is also number one for repeat teen pregnancies.

Lead in the blood stream can cause brain damage and behavioral disorders, and it is particularly dangerous for children, but the state of Texas is slow to inform residents how much lead is showing up in their communities.

David Martin Davies

There are neighborhoods in San Antonio where a high percentage of children are testing positive for lead poisoning.

Lead was eliminated from paint and gasoline decades ago, but the toxic element continues to turn up in blood tests of children. 

At the Robert B. Green pediatric clinic in downtown San Antonio, two-year old Lonnie Romo is here for his check-up. The visit includes finding out if he has lead in his blood.

Dr. Ryan Van Ramshorst asks Lonnie’s parents some routine questions.

"Does he put things in his mouth like soil or clay?"

 

A report released by the Bexar County Health Collaborative Tuesday notes a 20-year gap in life expectancy for people living in San Antonio area neighborhoods.

The Community Health Needs Assessment is released every three years. The 2016 report shows that near east side and near west side populations have a life expectancy of 70 to 74 years. Meanwhile, the life expectancy in far northwest and southeast Bexar County is 90 to 94 years.