public art | Texas Public Radio

public art

The mural when it was originally done.
David Blancas

A massive, iconic West Side mural is showing its age, but admirers are planning to save and improve it. 


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Public art is typically defined as artwork that enhances public spaces. But what happens when you involve the public in the creation of public art? That’s the case with a giant tree of life that is not only a jewel for an area mission, but an expression of San Antonio’s ranching history.

Michael Cirlos

A new art installation downtown grew out of some large black and white pictures by Michael Cirlos, extracted from his book Humans of San Antonio. It's in a spot that’s quite accessible but perhaps not in a place the public would normally visit.

Jack Morgan

The Treehouse at the Witte, that odd bus stop by the H-E-B on Broadway, and that great big gate at the Japanese Tea Garden. These are works of art that all look like wood, but aren't. These are the works of two men whose artistry far exceeds their fame. Those artists are Dionicio Rodriguez and Carlos Cortes.

Ansen Seale

Near railroad tracks, in the shadow of the Interstate 37 interchange, and about a football field away from the Alamodome, sits a house dating back to 1883 — a mauve- and cream-colored Roatzsch-Griesenbeck-Arciniega house, the only old structure within hundreds of yards.


From Texas Standard.

The next full moon falls on June 27. In the west Texas desert near Marfa – if you are in the high desert grasslands just east of town – you may spot an unlikely arrangement of large black or granite stones like a Texas Stonehenge. As the sun sets on that day, that megalith will begin to come to life.

Courtesy of Artpace San Antonio, Francisco Cortes

Houston Street is closing down on Saturday for an unconventional event. Once a year, "Chalk It Up" routes traffic away and makes downtown a place where people rule the asphalt.

Artist Diana Kersey built five towering circular ceramic pieces for VIA's Art in Transit Program at the bustling Five Points area, on Fredericksburg and N. Flores just Northwest of downtown.

Jack Morgan

Big changes are coming for one of San Antonio's most distinctive works of public art.

The River Walk barge tour totes tourists downtown on the San Antonio River, then to the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center area, where it turns around.

There is the Lila Cockrell Theatre. It's named after the first female mayor of San Antonio.

Right above the theater's entrance, a 130-foot wide, 30-foot tall mosaic overlooks the river. Due to its placement, and the convention center, this massive work of art has labored in obscurity its entire life.

Yesterday in New York, something very big happened outside Lincoln Center: One thousand people gathered to sing a new piece by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang. Entitled the public domain, it was a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Mostly Mozart festival.

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