PTSD | Texas Public Radio

PTSD

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Post-traumatic stress disorder affects an estimated 7.7 million American adults in a given year, yet this illness is largely underserved by the medical community. Many people afflicted with PTSD do not or cannot seek treatment.

There's growing evidence that a physical injury to the brain can make people susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Maximilian Uriarte

Hollywood, understandably, has a way of focusing on the drama of war. But War Zones aren't always pulse-pounders and hair-raising hellscapes. 

Sometimes war zones are paperwork and long walks with heavy packs. Sometimes the stories most worth paying attention to are the ones after the fire fight.

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Why do some American combat veterans suffers from the effects of Post Tramatic Stress Disorder - and others do not?

Courtesy Photo

A unique, privately-funded mental health care agency to serve veterans with PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury officially opened its doors today.

Family Endeavors, Inc., has provided mental health care in San Antonio for 45 years.

Family Endeavors CEO Travis Pearson says it’s a unique new mission to make it easier for military families to get the care they all need – all free of charge.

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Military suicides since 2003 have now eclipsed the number of troops who died in the Iraq War. This is the seventh year suicides have remained unusually high, with the Pentagon reporting that 265 active-duty soldiers had killed themselves in 2015. That number, paired with the Reservists and National Guard, brings the suicide toll above 500 per year for 2012, 2013, and 2014.

Why do these numbers remain high, and what research is being done?

Guest:

Staff Sgt. Eric James, an Army sniper who served two tours in Iraq, paused before he walked into a psychiatrist's office at Fort Carson, Colo. It was April 3, 2014. James clicked record on his smartphone, and then tucked the phone and his car keys inside his cap as he walked through the door to the chair by the therapist's desk.

Friday, at Texas’ oldest VFW post in San Antonio, Abbott signed six bills that were part of his veterans’ initiative.   The bills, carried mainly by Bexar County lawmakers, improve access to mental healthcare and make it easier for veterans and their families to acquire occupational licenses.

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Audie Murphy used to get as much fan mail as Rock Hudson, and now in his freshman classes at Baylor, David A. Smith is hard pressed to find two students that know who he was or why he was famous.

The star of Audie Murphy wasn't born on the big screen, but on the battlefields of Europe. Murphy, a diminutive boy of 17, lied about his age to join the Army--the only branch that would take him--and went on to become the most distinguished and decorated warrior of World War II. Pretty good for a poor Texas boy, who was the son of sharecroppers.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

TEMPLE — The family of a Central Texas veteran who committed suicide is suing the Department of Veterans Affairs, claiming a VA hospital should have involuntarily held him for treatment.

The Austin American-Statesman reports that a March 12 lawsuit alleges Kevin Lee Hartbarger committed suicide in 2012 hours after seeking help at the Olin E. Teague Veterans Medical Center in Temple.

The complaint alleges staffers at the hospital failed to “timely diagnose suicidal behavior and obtain involuntary hold to allow for treatment” through a court order.

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