PTSD | Texas Public Radio

PTSD

A growing number of programs try to treat PTSD by getting veterans into nature, even deep under the sea. But there's little scientific evidence that treatments like "scuba therapy" work.

The first time Lori Tipton tried MDMA, she was skeptical it would make a difference.

"I really was, at the beginning, very nervous," Tipton remembers.

MDMA is the main ingredient in club drugs ecstasy or molly. But Tipton wasn't taking pills sold on the street to get high at a party.

She was trying to treat her post-traumatic stress disorder, with the help of licensed therapists.

Tipton was given a dose of pure MDMA. Then she lay down in a quiet room with two specially-trained psychotherapists, one woman and one man.

Congress is considering legislation to encourage "outdoor therapy" for veterans with injuries or post-traumatic stress. Volunteer groups are already running similar programs in national parks.

 

The University of Central Florida is using virtual reality to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. It's worked well enough that the Pentagon will fund similar programs elsewhere.

Epileptic Council

Texas has one of the most restrictive medical marijuana programs in the country, according experts who track marijuana laws. But some lawmakers from both parties are ready to change that.

Pixabay

Congressman Joaquin Castro made an appeal to Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie on Wednesday, asking him to look into possible links between post-traumatic stress disorder and dementia.


Sexual trauma can be especially damaging for members of the military, where the perpetrator may be a commander and have access to weapons.

Photo courtesy of UT Health San Antonio

Researchers with University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio co-authored a groundbreaking study on post-traumatic stress disorder published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study found a common therapy proven effective for civilians also works for service members with combat PTSD.


A workshop in New York uses creative writing and Shakespearean monologues to help veterans heal.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Local veteran Andrew Sims began cycling 22 miles in 22 days on Veterans Day to bring awareness to the fact that 22 veterans commit suicide every day.

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