Politics | Texas Public Radio

Politics

State of Texas District Viewer

Following the primaries, Tea Party favorite Dr. Donna Campbell and Democrat John Courage emerged as the contenders for the Texas Senate District 25 seat.

The primary knocked longtime Senator Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio, out of the running, along with challenger, former Railroad Commissioner Elizabeth Ames Jones.

Perhaps one of the only issues Campbell and Courage agree upon is opposition to toll roads, but they have vastly different views on health care, education, and energy.

So how does a physician plan to serve full time in the Senate?

No one has a crystal ball to predict the upcoming election results, but one man says he's close.

A year ago, Josh Light says he introduced his web site, Politicit, which gives candidates an "it" score based on social media chatter and main stream media reports.

"You take all this data based on what people are doing and saying on the internet, we put it through a machine learning algorithm, and then it gives us a score we call an "it" score, and it correlates with election results," he said.

Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas is a well-known Mexican politician and son to Lázaro Cárdenas, one of Mexico’s most respected presidents. Cárdenas served as Senator of his home state of Michoacán from 1974 to 1980, and later as Governor of same state from 1980 to 1986. He was mayor of Mexico City from 1997 until 1999. Cárdenas is a founding member of Mexico's Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD) and has run for president on 3 different occasions.

This Presentation Aired on The Newsmaker Hour on 10/14/2012

State Rep. Pete Gallego, D-Alpine
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

From his stance that big banks are his opponent's focus and not small business, State Representative Pete Gallego, D-Alpine, said U.S. Congressman Francisco "Quico" Canseco, R-Texas, went to Washington, D.C. and became a part of the problem. Canseco said he wants growth in the private sector, where his opponent would destroy the country's economic force.

Each of the candidates argued back and forth on a stage at Palo Alto College Tuesday night. The debate was hosted by Univision and AARP, and conducted entirely in Spanish.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

The Youth Vote:

Women and middle class voters are two demographics the presidential campaigns are targeting this election, but they’re not the only ones. The youth vote is credited with playing a major role in the 2008 elections and is being looked at again as a potential x-factor.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

In a crowded Time Warner Cable Arena, applause echoed off the walls of the place where Charlotte’s hometown teams – the Bobcats and the Checkers – play their games.

Thousands of Democrats have come together to back a Commander in Chief they say has done so much for the Latino community. They say it’s time to once again rise up and back him – to help him win this election.

San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

Mayor Castro's remarks put his own personal story about his family’s sacrifice in the spotlight, while at the same time remaining focused on a clear message that separated the Democratic party's views from those of the GOP.

Castro told the story of his late grandmother’s journey from Mexico to San Antonio nearly 100 years ago, and how she had to drop out of school to work to help take care of the family. But he also spent some time defining the differences between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney - presumably with some encouragement by the Obama campaign.

July 2016
Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The Democratic Party released its platform that calls for higher taxes on wealthier Americans, abortion rights, and marriage equality, something that’s never been a part of the platform before.

The platform now says the Democratic Party “supports the right of all families to have equal respect, responsibilities, and protections under the law.”

Ryan Poppe

“I’m excited and of course a little bit nervous, and I know that it’s a very important moment,” said Mayor Julián Castro, who will deliver the keynote address tonight and tell how far his family has come in his American story.  

“It’s a 'made in America' story that is so common throughout the generations, no matter where folks have come from,” said Castro.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa
Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

Speaking at the Latino Leaders Lunch as chairman of the Democratic National Convention, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said he doesn’t cry much, but he did when President Barack Obama instituted deferred deportation of young Americans brought into the country by their undocumented parents.

“Because," said Villaraigosa, "these people are not only our future, they’re the best and brightest; they’re the strongest!”

Pages