Politics | Texas Public Radio

Politics

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

President Donald Trump's re-election campaign faces a crowded field of Democrats who want to challenge him for the presidency. Among them is Julian Castro. The former San Antonio mayor and secretary of U.S. Housing and Urban Development is not a household name. But he is working to change that.

Epileptic Council

Texas has one of the most restrictive medical marijuana programs in the country, according experts who track marijuana laws. But some lawmakers from both parties are ready to change that.

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / The Texas Tribune

After months of intense speculation, Democrat Beto O'Rourke told El Paso television station KTSM via text Wednesday that he is running for president in 2020, the station reported.

From Texas Standard

As Election Day gets closer, the airwaves are getting more crowded with political ads. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and his challenger, Congressman Beto O'Rourke, in particular, have raised lots of money in their campaigns and are now spending it on TV and radio.

Austin-based Marketplace reporter Andy Uhler noticed some of the ads in English and Spanish are complicated by more than the issue of translation.

Today more women are running for office than ever before. Just in time for the midterm elections, a new short film highlights two Texas women who were among the first in the modern era to have a large impact on politics. The film “Molly & Ann” follows the stories of Texas Governor Ann Richards and journalist Molly Ivins.

Paul Stekler, documentary filmmaker and radio-television-film professor at the University of Texas at Austin, is the director of the short film.

“I had all this footage. We had done short pieces about them when I had my old series "Special Session" on KLRU. I thought ... How could we put this together and get it out in the world? Over the summer I realized that if could use the Women’s March and throw forward, 'cause this was what they worked for in their own ways,” Stekler says.

Why Is The Center Missing From Texas Politics?

Sep 29, 2018

From Texas Standard:

During these highly partisan times, you might be wondering, what happened to the political center? What happened to that willingness to work together despite party affiliation to get things done? Experts agree the center is definitely not holding. And they’re not sure when it’s going to come back.

Pixabay/Public Domain http://bit.ly/2NkmJVa

Since Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' run for president in 2016, the nation's movement towards democratic socialism has gained traction as a new American political concept. 


Axiomphoto.net by Ternell Washington

On Fridays, we give you a preview of some of the weekend's most interesting events. This week, it's a little different, with an emphasis on the last event.  

First off, on Saturday at the Institute of Texan Cultures Buddhist monks are creating a community mandala out of colorful sands. It's called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, and promises to be both fascinating and beautiful. Then on Saturday night, Texas original Billy Joe Shaver is playing a great live outdoor venue outside of Boerne, the Round Up. 

From Texas Standard:

As Senate Republicans struggle to nail down the votes they need among their own ranks to pass a bill that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, many inside and outside the party are once again consider what it means to be loyal in the era of President Donald Trump. The conundrum has been around since the campaign, when revelations about Trump's actions and behavior kept many GOP members from embracing him fully.

Washington Post Reporter David Fahrenthold is a Houston native who earned a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on then-candidate Trump's claims about charitable giving. Fahrenthold also broke the story of the "Access Hollywood" tape, days before the election. He spoke with Host David Brown at the Texas Tribune Festival.

From Texas Standard:

An article by New Yorker staff writer and Texas resident Lawrence Wright makes the case that Texas is a political bellwether. In "America's Future Is Texas," Wright argues that, indeed, as Texas goes, so goes the nation — politically speaking, at any rate.

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