police brutality | Texas Public Radio

police brutality

The San Antonio Spurs basketball team will wear jerseys with social justice phrases.
San Antonio Spurs

This week the San Antonio Spurs basketball team posted a photo of new jerseys on Facebook. Phrases like "BLACK LIVES MATTER" and "I CAN'T BREATHE" adorn the new uniforms.

Editor’s Note: This audio contains disturbing police tape from the moments when Elijah McClain was arrested. 

Black musicians and protesters have gathered at violin vigils across the country for Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old Black man who died in police custody.

*This post was updated on Monday, July 20, at 4:10 p.m.

The recent deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other Black individuals during encounters with law enforcement officers sparked protests and renewed calls for police reform in cities throughout the U.S. 


San Antonio ISD high school students hold a news conference to ask for more student input before the district's school board meeting Monday, Feb. 10, 2020.
File Photo | Camille Phillips |Texas Public Radio

When Marsha Madrigal was in middle school, she thought it was normal to see her classmates in handcuffs.

But she knows now that not all schools have a significant police presence, and the odds of seeing your classmates arrested go up if you are Black, like she is.

The 2018 Fox Tech High School graduate wants the San Antonio Independent School District to remove police from its schools so future middle schoolers never think it’s normal to see classmates in handcuffs. 

The deaths of 27-year-old Carlos Ingram-Lopez in Tucson and 18-year old Andres Guardado in Los Angeles have reignited calls to not only end incidents of police brutality against Black people, but also those against Latinx people.

Protesters join hands as they face police officers in San Antonio on May 30, 2020.
Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

When protesters across the U.S. started marching through city streets late last month, demanding justice for George Floyd, state and local leaders sounded a familiar alarm. 


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Updated at 7:55 p.m ET

President Trump on Thursday met with pastors, law enforcement officials and small-business owners at a church in Dallas to discuss plans to "build safety, opportunity and dignity," following recent nationwide protests against police brutality.

"It's going to end up very good for everybody," Trump said.

Two men look on at protestors in San Antonio on May 30.
Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

In times of civil unrest or social upheaval, protests seek to raise awareness for a message or cause in solidarity with others. Crowds of people seeking to alter the status quo march in close proximity, often chanting, shouting and singing -- none of which are conducive to mitigating the spread of COVID-19.


From Texas Standard:

Protests in the wake of the death of Houston native George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody have highlighted, again, the ways in which many communities and their police departments are at odds. Cities across the state, even those with so-called progressive reputations,  are facing protests against police brutality.

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