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oil industry

From Texas Standard:

A recently-published health study indicates expectant mothers living near extensive oil and gas development run a higher risk of having children with birth defects.

The Trump Administration is rolling back some of the Obama-era safety regulations for offshore drilling that were meant to prevent a repeat of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion, the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

The change pertains to rules aimed at keeping offshore oil and gas wells from "blowing out" – a sudden and uncontrollable release of crude oil.

Multinational oil giant Chevron will buy the American oil and gas production and exploration company Anadarko Petroleum in a $33 billion cash-and-stock deal that strengthens Chevron's position in the booming Permian Basin.

Ten miles out in the Gulf of Mexico, off the tip of Louisiana, the fumes become overwhelming. "See how it's all rainbow sheen there? So that's oil," says Ian MacDonald, who's guiding us in a tiny fishing boat that's being tossed around by 6-foot waves.

MacDonald is a scientist at Florida State University where he studies oil spills. This one is not a black, sticky slick, but it stretches on for miles. And here, where the murky Mississippi River dumps into the Gulf, it's been leaking for more than 14 years.

From Texas Standard:

Taxes. They tend be something many of us avoid thinking about until a certain time of the year. But they are, of course, an everyday reality when you buy something at the store or when you fill up your gas tank.

Flickr user Mark Sardella / cc

Oil and gas prices are down, just in time for holiday travel. But that also means less revenue for the state. How might this impact the upcoming legislative session?


From Texas Standard:

With communities bowing under the stress of school overcrowding, soaring traffic fatalities, drug abuse and strains on the power grid, more than a dozen top U.S. energy companies have pledged $100 million toward easing the stresses caused by the natural gas boom in the Permian Basin area of West Texas.

Oil prices continued to fall Friday, amid weaker global demand and increased output in the United States, to the lowest price this year. The cost of a barrel dropped below $60, a decrease of more than 20 percent from its peak last month.

President Trump has credited Saudi Arabia with the falling oil prices. "Thank you to Saudi Arabia, but let's go lower!" he wrote in a tweet on Tuesday. He called the drop "a big Tax Cut for America and the World."

But the drop in prices has raised concerns about the international economy, as well as domestic growth in the United States.

Oil prices have been falling dramatically since hitting four-year highs in October. On Thursday, two benchmarks — Brent Crude and West Texas Intermediate — fell to prices that are around 20 percent lower than a month earlier. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Regan (@Reganonymous), senior editor for Bloomberg News.

From Texas Standard

Oil companies have long been blamed for playing a role in climate change. But now, those companies are asking the government to protect their interests from the harsher storms and higher tides connected with global warming.

Companies on the Texas Gulf Coast, which is still recovering from Hurricane Harvey, are pushing for a 60-mile stretch of sea walls and levees that would help protect homes, beaches and, yes, oil infrastructure, from the next big storm.

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