Norma Cantú | Texas Public Radio

Norma Cantú

Born on the Laredo-Nuevo Laredo border, Norma Cantú explores the joy, sadness, love, life and the deaths experienced along the border in her new collection of poetry, “Meditación Fronteriza: Poems of Love, Life, and Labor.” (00:30)

Then, Mexican culture comes alive every holiday season with tamales. Making tamales is a family affair where everyone has a role. Carmen Tafolla and Ellen Riojas Clark are the co-authors of “Tamales, Comadres, and the Meaning of Civilization.” (12:10)


Courtesy of Norma Elia Cantú

The newest novel by a self-described daughter of the borderlands, Norma Elia Cantú, isn’t a memoir or autobiography, even though it draws on her own personal experiences.

Cabañuelas” documents Cantú’s young adult life when she sets off to Spain in 1980 to study the country’s culture — specifically, its fiestas. Cantú reflects on Spanish traditions and compares it to South Texas communities that were conquered by Europeans centuries ago.

Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

What exactly does “Hispanic” mean? To whom does that term apply? Would “Latino” be preferable? What about “Mexican American,” or “Chicano”?


Chicanas Movidas: New Narratives of Activism and Feminism in the Movement Era is a collection of essays written by Chicana scholars and activists about Chicanas who organized and resisted during the Chicano Movement.

Dionne Espinoza, Maylei Blackwell, and Maria Eugenia Cotera edited the book.