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News

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Advocates for medical and recreational marijuana in Texas said the state is hypocritical for opposing reforms while profiting off the industry.

A restricted area sign at Lake Dunlap.
Courtesy of GBRA

Four Texas lakes will be “dewatered” by the end of September, according to the Guadalupe Blanco River Authority.


Texas Public Radio file photo

County Judge Nelson Wolff said the Bexar County Democratic Party made the right call to not boycott the Bill Miller restaurant chain.


Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET Thursday

Officials in Philadelphia are praising city law enforcement for peacefully resolving a chaotic episode Wednesday night in which a gunman armed with an AR-15 and a handgun fired off more than 100 rounds, hitting six police officers, then barricaded himself inside a residence, creating a more than seven-hour standoff.

The suspect is now in custody and all six wounded officers have been released from local hospitals.

Ionization Labs Cann ID testing module.
Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

For the last two months, dozens of county and district attorneys in Texas have not prosecuted low-level marijuana crimes. That’s because they lack a reliable and affordable way to distinguish between marijuana and hemp, which was just legalized.


 Gregg Dimmick, left, and Sol Garza shift through dirt for artifacts from one dig site at the Long Barrack.
Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

Archaeologists are digging through the summer heat to complete a major project at the Alamo for preservation efforts — and the occasional discovery of artifacts. 

  

FBI and ICE officials speak outside of the Immigration Enforcement and Removal Operations office.
Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

Several shots fired into an office building on San Antonio's Northeast Side are being treated as an assault against federal agents.

Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

Many El Pasoans are grieving through their own spiritual and religious traditions following the mass shooting at a Walmart that killed 22 people on Aug. 3. 

A memorial outside the store first began as a few flowers and candles but has grown into a massive display of community support. Dozens of posters line the fence above hundreds of religious candles and people continue to share their own methods of comfort. 

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

El Pasoans are extending themselves to help one another after the mass shooting at a Walmart that left 22 people dead and more than two dozen injured. Among those still in the hospital are two youth soccer coaches, Luis Calvillo and Memo Garcia.


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

It’s Sunday afternoon and church-goers shuffled into El Paso’s historic Sacred Heart Parish. Tucked away in Segundo Barrio, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods, the church is a spiritual anchor to the predominantly immigrant community it serves.

Sacred Heart is less than one mile from an international bridge that connects El Paso to its sister city, Ciudad Juárez.

This weekend, there was a different presence of peace as four therapy dogs quietly sat in the back pew, ready to greet parishioners.

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