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New Braunfels

New Braunfels police officers in pursuit of a zebra that later died.
New Braunfels Police Department

Two zebras that escaped in New Braunfels on Wednesday afternoon died after their capture and return.

Josh Kohanek

The Mid-Texas Symphony is presenting its new conductor to the communities it serves. Her name is Akiko Fujimoto, and you may remember her.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A proposed limestone rock quarry in Comal County worries some residents who live near the site. They discussed their fear the quarry could compromise air and water quality and heavy trucks could damage roads during a public comment meeting Tuesday night at the New Braunfels convention center, which attracted over 400 people.

Roxanne Dorn

A scrappy young opera company is staging a masked ball in New Braunfels on New Year's Eve. It’s the Hill Country Opera, headed by Arden Dorn.

 


Flickr user Jeff Gunn / cc

As of right now, people tubing on the Comal and Guadalupe rivers in New Braunfels can take canned drinks, alcoholic and nonalcoholic, on the river. The so called “can ban,” is not in effect.

Last week, an appeals court overturned a previous ruling that kept the city from enforcing the ordinance. City leaders want to discuss it before making any changes.

nbtexas.org / City of New Braunfels

Three years after purchasing a former Albertson’s grocery building, the City of New Braunfels is moving into its new City Hall facility on Monday. 

Flickr user Jeff Gunn / cc

The City of New Braunfels is getting ready for a busy Memorial Day weekend of tubers on the Comal and Guadalupe rivers.

The city has implemented a new $2 river access fee on the Comal for people who bring their own tubes on weekends and holidays this summer.

“That’s the same $2 that anybody pays when they go to an outfitter,” said New Braunfels Convention and Visitors Bureau Director Judy Young. “So, it’s really just a very minimal amount of money – less than a cup of coffee – to help us take care of our beautiful resources.”

New Braunfels-Based Purple Heart Recipient Among Bikers Killed In Waco

May 21, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

 WACO — One of nine bikers killed at a shootout outside a Texas restaurant was a Vietnam veteran and Purple Heart recipient whose family members dispute police claims he was in a criminal group.

An Associated Press review of Texas court records and a database maintained by the state Department of Public Safety turned up no criminal history in Texas for Jesus Delgado Rodriguez, 65, of New Braunfels. And his son Vincent Ramirez told the San Antonio Express-News that he was not violent.

Rodriguez was one of nine bikers killed Sunday when gunfire erupted at Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, where motorcyclists had gathered for a meeting. Authorities have said the shooting began during an apparent confrontation between two rival motorcycle gangs — the Bandidos and the Cossacks.

Waco police spokesman Sgt. W. Patrick Swanton told the AP on Wednesday that all those killed were part of those two gangs. He did not return phone messages Thursday seeking comment about Rodriguez.

Military records show Rodriguez was a Marine on active duty from 1969 and 1973, and received the Purple Heart, given to those wounded or killed in action. He also received a Navy commendation medal and other awards.

Family members said Rodriguez was a biker and had belonged to two now-defunct motorcycle clubs, one of which allowed couples.

Will the Austin-San Antonio area become the new Dallas-Ft. Worth? New census data shows that Hays and Comal Counties are among the fastest growing in the country. Both grew by around four percent last year, which has some mayors and city planners considering the possibility of a new mega-region.

Rockin R River Rides, New Braunfels

By the time it’s put into practice, even a basic city ordinance can become complex and confusing.

Such is the case with the New Braunfels ‘Can Ban,’ which prohibits tubers from taking disposable containers onto the water, an ordinance that is now in the hands of the state’s Third Court of Appeals.

The New Braunfels ordinance was passed in 2011 with the intent to reduce litter on the Comal and Guadalupe Rivers.

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