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natural gas

As more cities and states try to cut carbon emissions, some are taking aim at a new target: natural gas inside homes. Buildings, through heating and cooking, use almost a third of the natural gas consumed in the U.S.

In July, Berkeley, Calif., became the first city in the country to ban natural gas in new buildings, starting next year. City officials say new efficient electric appliances have lower carbon footprints than gas-powered furnaces and water heaters.

From Texas Standard:

Brownsville, Texas, is one of the poorest metropolitan areas in the nation. But it is now being considered for almost $40 billion worth of investment. Three energy companies are planning projects to bring liquefied natural gas plants to the area – striking community controversy and organized opposition to the proposals.

From Texas Standard:

Most of the liquefied natural gas, or LNG, the U.S. exports leaves on big tanker ships. But with so much natural gas being produced right now, companies are seeking out other ways to move LNG internationally. In fact, at least one company has carved out a niche by shipping natural gas overland, tapping into a growing market south of the border.

Sergio Chapa reports on the oil and gas industry for the Houston Chronicle. He says the tankers transporting LNG are similar to the 18-wheelers that deliver gasoline or diesel, but much bigger.

A planned liquefied natural gas facility near Brownsville would boost energy export opportunities, but also poses a risk to Texas ocelots.

Energy companies in West Texas have more natural gas than they know what to do with. So they’re burning it off, using a process called “flaring.”

As Travis Bubenik (@travisbubenik) of Houston Public Media reports, that’s prompting concerns among critics who are concerned about air pollution and the effects on dark skies.

From Texas Standard:

In February, 12-year-old Linda Rogers died when her home in Northwest Dallas exploded as she was getting ready for school. A preliminary report cited a crack in a natural gas line.

An investigation by the Dallas Morning News finds that, since 2006, more than two dozen homes across  North and Central Texas have been destroyed or damaged because of natural gas leaking from Atmos Energy's aging system. Nine people have died. At least 22 others have been injured.

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

From Texas Standard.

A gas explosion in Dallas killed a 12-year-old girl last month and prompted the evacuation of a northwest neighborhood of close to 3,000 people.

From Texas Standard.

After more than half a century, the U.S. appears to have become a net exporter of liquefied natural gas. The last time we would have been able to say that was when Eisenhower was president. The development is a major shift from predictions just a decade ago, when the U.S. was expected to have to rely on liquefied natural gas imports from Russia, Northern Africa and the Middle East forever, it seemed. What’s changed? Here to put things into perspective is energy insider Matt Smith, director of commodity research at Clipper Data.

Natural Gas Explosion Rocks South Texas Town

Oct 16, 2015

A fiery natural gas pipeline explosion in South Texas has been contained.

San Antonio-based Lewis Energy Group confirmed the incident occurred in Encinal, 25 miles north of Laredo, about 4:15 Friday morning.

Encinal City Manager Velma Davila says many residents were startled when they heard the explosion. ”They were woken up with the large sound, the explosion,” she said.  “I think people just got up, got scared and started leaving their homes because they weren’t aware of what happened.”

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