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Native Americans

A Native Texas Tribe Now Has Legal Eagle Feathers

Jun 20, 2016

From Texas Standard:

They called it "Operation Powwow"  back in 2006, a federal agent went undercover to raid a tribal ceremony. It ended with threats of prison time and fines for tribe members participating in the powwow.

The crime? Using eagle feathers without a permit.

But now the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas has won a decade-long legal battle over use of the feathers, what the tribe considers to be a victory for religious liberty.

 


Cody Pedersen and his wife, Inyan, know that in an emergency they will have to wait for help to arrive.

Cody, 29, and his family live in Cherry Creek, a Native American settlement within the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in north central South Dakota.

The reservation is bigger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined. But Cherry Creek has no general store, no gas station and few jobs.

Frank Waln is a rapper and member of the Sicangu Lakota. He grew up on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. Waln has rapped about the Keystone XL Pipeline, his battle with depression, and the modern Native American experience.

Waln joins Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson to talk about his new album, Tokiya, which comes out this year, and his efforts to be a role model for young Native Americans.

Joseph Medicine Crow, a World War II veteran, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and revered elder of the Crow Nation, died Sunday at the age of 102.

Born in a log home near Lodge Grass, Montana, Crow became the first member of the Crow Nation to earn a graduate degree.

He was a Crow War Chief, having completed the required four war deeds while fighting for the 103rd Infantry in Germany during World War II.

David Martin Davies

It’s the most misunderstood cactus in Texas – Peyote. For thousands of years before the arrival of the European it was a sacred plant for the original peoples of North America. But today it remains an illegal controlled substance and the future of peyote is in doubt.

In American popular culture, peyote is a substance that is linked to the mystical – metaphysical and the bizarre. In the most recent edition of the video game Grand Theft Auto the player seeks out peyote plants and gets the virtual experience of grand hallucinations and animal vision quests.

Ivan Pierre Aguirre / Texas Tribune

This week on Fronteras: 

--Pope Francis travels a migrant’s path in Mexico, ending up in Ciudad Juarez, a city where some have felt hopeless.  

--In New Mexico, Native Americans finally are regaining some of their conquered ancestral lands.

--Texas Republicans are worried about winning their share of the Latino presidential primary vote on Super Tuesday.

-- A San Diego program serves as a catalyst, encouraging immigrant parents to finish their education.

--Racial slurs prompt Texas A&M officials to apologize to some Dallas students.

Simon A. Eugster / Wikimedia Commons

Classical music has borrowed from folk melodies for centuries, but when it comes to American heritage, you’re more likely to find music based on blues, jazz, or rural Appalachia than the original sounds of the continent—songs and melodies of Native Americans. Two new albums approach Native American sounds from different angles, and both are worth examination.

Native American Tribe Bets On Olive Oil

Nov 29, 2015

The bucolic Capay Valley is about an hour outside Sacramento, Calif., and its ranches, alfalfa fields and small, organic produce farms have earned it a reputation as an agricultural gem. It's pretty serene, except for the cacophony inside the valley's most lucrative business, the Cache Creek Casino.

Native American youth living on reservations can often face an overwhelming array of challenges, including poverty, addiction and abuse. Partly because of hurdles, high school dropout rates and suicides are far higher on reservations than the national average.

Native American actors have walked off the set of an Adam Sandler movie that they say insults their culture.

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