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military bases

Lackland Gateway walkway
Eileen Pace / TPR

Unless action is taken to reduce heat-trapping emissions, Lackland Air Force Base could start seeing more than 100 days of extreme heat each year. That’s according to a study released Monday by the Union of Concerned Scientists. 


Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/2pirEf1

An Air Force cargo plane made an emergency landing at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland Thursday afternoon after a training mission. Eleven personnel from the 433rd Airlift Wing were onboard, but no injuries were reported.  


Photo courtesy of San Antonio International Airport Public Relations

San Antonio International Airport was dotted with camouflage Wednesday as service members from the Army, Navy and Air Force checked baggage and made their way through security lines.

More than 3,000 servicemembers from local military installations arrived at San Antonio airport on their way home for the holidays.


U. S. Army Environmental Command photo by Neal Snyder

A brush fire ignited in a rough terrain area at Joint Base San Antonio - Camp Bullis over the weekend. Officials from JBSA Fire Emergency Service responded to reports of a fire around 1 p.m. Saturday.

An immediate call went out for assistance from partner agencies, which included JBSA-Lackland, Fort Sam Houston and Randolph, as well as the San Antonio Fire Department and Bexar Bulverde Fire Department.

The 16-acre brush fire stayed contained to Camp Bullis, and was stopped more than 200 feet from the perimeter of the Dominion subdivision.

Carson Frame / TPR News

An Air Force reserve crew flew from JBSA-Lackland to Houston with relief supplies on Wednesday.  It was the first heavy cargo load to be airlifted to the flood-ravaged city. 

Stephanie Howard

Filmed over five years, THE WEIGHT OF HONOR follows the lives of the caregivers of veterans who have been catastrophically wounded in America’s longest war. Their lives are transformed overnight to 24/7 caregivers tasked with caring for their war-wounded. The film reveals the family dynamics, their relationships before the wounds of war, and the uncertainties that lie ahead.  

U.S. Army - Fort Hood

WASHINGTON — The U.S. military has increased the threat level at bases across North America. Officials say the incremental boost will likely mean heightened vigilance and more random bag or vehicle checks.

The baseline level went from A to B, although most military installations — including the Pentagon — were already at a slightly higher level of protection than level A. There are four levels, A through D.

Army Col. Steve Warren says the increase was not triggered by a specific event.

Gillibrand2010 / Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON — In a scathing critique of the Defense Department’s efforts to curb sexual assaults, a U.S. senator warned Monday that the true scope of sex-related violence in the military communities is “vastly underreported” and that victims continue to struggle for justice.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said in a report that the Pentagon refused to provide her with all the information she requested about sexual assaults at several major bases. The material she did receive revealed that the spouses of service members and civilian women who live or work near military facilities are especially vulnerable to being sexually assaulted.

Yet they “remain in the shadows” because neither is counted in Defense Department surveys to determine the prevalence of sexual assaults, the report said. “I don’t think the military is being honest about the problem,” Gillibrand said in an interview.

The senator said her analysis of 107 sexual assault cases found punishments that were too lenient and the word of the alleged assailant was more likely to be believed than the victim. Less than a quarter of the cases went to trial and just 11 resulted in conviction for a sex crime. Female civilians were the victims in more than half the cases, said Gillibrand, an outspoken advocate for an overhaul of the military justice system.