migrants | Texas Public Radio

migrants

Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported its agents apprehended more than 800,000 migrants since last October along the U.S.-Mexico border, and many took place in the Border Patrol's Del Rio sector.

After months of reports of migrants being crammed into dangerously overcrowded facilities, acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan got some good news during a visit Thursday to one of the Border Patrol's busiest sectors.

"On May 31, we had over 5,300 people in custody here in El Paso sector. On June 15, that number was reduced down to 3,000. And on July 1, we had just close to 550 in custody," Chris Clem, deputy chief of the El Paso Border Patrol sector, told McAleenan in a briefing.

"I'm here today because I want to put an end to this," Yazmin Juárez told members of Congress tearfully on Wednesday.

Lawmakers listened as Juárez testified about the preventable death of her daughter in 2018, weeks after they were released from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody.

For the first time this year, the number of migrants taken into custody by immigration authorities after crossing the Southwest border dropped in June.

The Department of Homeland Security announced on Tuesday that about 104,000 migrants were taken into custody after crossing the Southwest border — a 28% drop from May.

Migrant flows typically slow down in the hotter summer months, and federal officials credited Mexico with doing more to secure its borders and stop migrants from crossing into the U.S.

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Thousands of migrant children and adults are currently subject to dangerous overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and prolonged internment at U.S. detention facilities.


Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

People who attempted to donate soap, diapers and other supplies to children held in detention facilities on the Texas-Mexico border claim federal agents rejected their offers.


Veronica G. Cardenas for Texas Public Radio

A Honduran woman sat with her young son outside the Holding Institute, a community center in Laredo that cares for migrants, as the sun began to set. It was a special moment of serenity in a place that also offers migrants some stability and safety.

The surge of Central American migrants crossing into the U.S. isn't just taxing border agents and the nation's immigration system — it's straining interior checkpoints like one on Highway 281 in Texas.

An hour's drive north of the U.S.-Mexico border, the new and expanded Falfurrias checkpoint is on a major route for traffickers shepherding people or drugs north.

Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

The U.S. and Mexico reached an agreement on Friday that was expected to defuse the Trump administration's threat of tariffs on Mexican products. Mexico said it will do more to stop the flow of migrants coming north, which includes immediately expanding the Migrant Protection Protocols across its entire southern border.


Dominic Anthony Walsh | Texas Public Radio

Some migrant boys and girls housed in San Antonio got the chance to do something they don’t often get to do: take a break and play.

A city councilman organized a soccer game complete with goals, nets, balls and professional players at Travis Park.

Councilman Robert Trevino said children and their families fleeing unrest in Central America are being housed and cared for by Catholic Charities of San Antonio as they seek political asylum and a more permanent place to stay in the U.S.

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