migrants | Texas Public Radio

migrants

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The roof of a downtown San Antonio church collapsed overnight as heavy rains passed through the Alamo City.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

A migrant resource center operated by the city and local charities is closing because the number of migrants arriving in the city has dropped.

Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Thousands of asylum seekers in Matamoros, Mexico, across the Rio Grande from Brownsville, don’t have access to clean water. They have to use the Rio Grande for bathing, washing clothes and cooling off from the blistering heat. Migrants have developed skin infections, and some have drowned. But a group of volunteers is trying to make their lives better.


The number of migrants taken into custody after crossing the southern border declined for the fourth consecutive month, according to new figures released by the Trump administration.

Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

More than 30,000 asylum seeking migrants have been returned to Mexico to await their day in immigration court — a process that can take months. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The program says vulnerable populations may be excluded from the program, but many migrants who are considered vulnerable populations, including LGBTQ asylum seekers, are still being sent back to Mexico.


Richard Loria for Texas Public Radio

U.S. officials have sent back to Mexico more than 30,000 asylum-seeking migrants to wait for their immigration court dates. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program. Pregnant women are among some of the people sent back. But one attorney from the Rio Grande Valley pushed back at the policy. She tried to get her client paroled and back into Texas.


Reynaldo Leanos Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Tens of thousands of migrants are in limbo in Mexican border towns because of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The migrants wait for months in sometimes-dangerous conditions before they may appear in a U.S. immigration court. So some volunteers decided to transform a problem into an opportunity. They opened a special school for migrant children in Matamoros so that the kids' education could continue.

New Facilities For Migrant Children Slated For Texas

Aug 27, 2019
Inside Casa Sunzal, an unaccompanied minor shelter run by Southwest Key.
Courtesy of Southwest Key

State authorities are mulling over applications for two new shelters that would hold unaccompanied migrant children. Confirmation of the new shelters comes as Southwest Key closes down two of its facilities.

One day last week in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, a fearsome gun battle broke out on the main boulevard to the airport, as drivers careened off the thoroughfare in terror while rival narcos blasted away at each other.

The Cartel of the Northeast operates with impunity here, cruising around town in armored, olive-drab pickups with Tropas del Infierno, Spanish for "Soldiers from Hell," emblazoned on the doors.

A mobile unit with showers, toilets, sinks and one laundry room with a full washer and dryer.
Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

Asylum-seeking migrants often make it to San Antonio without having the opportunity to bathe for weeks beforehand. Similarly, there are residents of San Antonio who don't have access to clean water. 


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