Mexican-American | Texas Public Radio

Mexican-American

New York University Press

Laura E. Gómez is a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles.  Her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race” explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.

Gómez said when 19th century Americans started moving west, they encountered Mexican-Americans, which fell in between the existing racial class of black and white.


New York University Press

On Fronteras:

 

In 1848,  the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo brought to an end the Mexican-American war, which was started in 1846 over a territorial dispute in Texas. The treaty led to land that has become Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah and Wyoming.

Laura E. Gómez, a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles, joins us to discuss her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race,” which explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.


National Archives and Record Administration

On Feb. 2, 1848, a treaty was signed that ended the U.S.-Mexican War and ceded 525,000 square miles of land from Mexico to the U.S., including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. The Rio Grande was designated the boundary between Texas and Mexico. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo also created a new population of Mexican-Americans, and Mexicans on new U.S. territory could either remain Mexican citizens, return to Mexico, or claim U.S. citizenship.

The 170th anniversary of that signing is something Hispanic communities in the U.S. are celebrating as a part of their heritage, calling it Segundo de Febrero.


Melissa Reyna, from left; Sylvia Garcia; Luis Silva; Priscilla Garza; Jarin Huspeth; Kimberly Moreno; Sabrina Cordova; and Andres Lopez.
File Photo | Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

Texas Public Radio has been following the path of Mexican-American studies in Texas public schools.

Last week we visited a San Antonio high school that’s implementing a Mexican-American course as an elective.


John David Scarcliff Photography

From ballet to Mexican songs to the Symphony Pops concert, music dominates this weekend in San Antonio.


Pages