mental health | Texas Public Radio

mental health

Men have historically been more likely to commit suicide than women, but a new, vulnerable group is emerging from their ranks: middle-aged men. That age group includes comedian Robin Williams, who committed suicide last month at age 63. The rate for middle-aged men now eclipses older men, who historically have had the highest rate of suicide.

Say a pediatrician notices that one of her teenage patients is showing signs of depression. In most cases, the doctor will notify parents and prescribe an antidepressant or recommend a therapist.

The trouble is, many of those teens won't go to therapy or won't stick with it. And that's part of a bigger problem: Nearly two-thirds of adolescents who have had a major depressive episode don't get treatment, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Mental Health Meets 'Moneyball' In San Antonio

Aug 21, 2014

The jails aren't overflowing in San Antonio anymore. People with serious mental illnesses have a place to go for treatment and the city has saved $10 million a year on. How did it happen?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's almost 4 p.m., and police officers Ernest Stevens and Ned Bandoske have been driving around town in their unmarked black SUV since early this morning. The officers are part of San Antonio's mental health squad — a six-person unit that answers the frequent emergency calls where mental illness may be an issue.

The officers spot a call for help on their laptop from a group home across town.

"A male individual put a blanket on fire this morning," Stevens reads from the blotter. "He's arguing ... and is a danger to himself and others. He's off his medications."

The tragic death of one of the world’s best-loved comedians may serve to change the public conversation about depression. Robin Williams’ suicide has more people talking about taking a greater role in looking out for loved ones that could be suffering.

Everyone seemed to love him, but no one seemed to understand the depth of his depression. From Facebook and Twitter to news website, the actor's death has fueled a new conversation about depression, about sensitivity, about looking for signs among our friends and family.

Everyone seems to talk about feeling stressed out. But what's the reality of stress in America these days?

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a nationwide poll in March and early April to find out.

Our questions zeroed in on the effect of stress in Americans' lives. We asked about people's personal experiences with stress in the preceding month and year. We also asked about how they perceived the effects of stress, how they cope with stress and their attitudes about it.

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

Map created by the Texas Primary Care Office

Fronteras: There's a critical shortage of mental health care workers in Texas, and the problem is especially apparent in the borderlands. The Texas Democratic Party chair speaks about the party's top candidates, its platform and more as the convention arrives this weekend. For San Antonio artist Cruz Ortiz, culture is everything. He speaks about the inspiration for his Tex-Mex artwork and new exhibit at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center.

Texas governor's office

Speaking outside the opening of a new medical center at Fort Hood, Gov. Rick Perry announced a plan that uses groups of hospitals to provide speedier medical services to military veterans who have waited months to be seen by a doctor at U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs medical clinics.   

That plan includes hospitals throughout the state willing to work with the federal government to speed up the time it takes for a veteran to be seen by a doctor.

Pages