mental health | Texas Public Radio

mental health

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

This story was updated at 9:50 a.m.

First responders across Texas are learning how to better deal with those with mental illness. They are attending a weeklong course in crisis intervention training hosted by the San Antonio Police Department’s mental health unit. 

President Donald Trump offered a blunt take on Devin Kelley, the mass shooter who opened fire at a church in Sutherland Springs over the weekend, during a press conference Monday in Japan.

New research suggests that Latino children are more likely to suffer from depression and other mental health illnesses, but only 8 percent of Latinos say their child has received mental health services.

Latino youth are depressed at a higher rate than any minority besides Native Americans, according to the Salud America! network at UT Health San Antonio.

Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

Leaders from seven Texas cities gathered in San Antonio on Tuesday and Wednesday to learn about a model of success for adults living with mental illness. It’s called the Clubhouse movement, and it’s helping people stay out of psychiatric hospitals, reconnect with family members, and return to the workforce.  

One in five Americans have experienced a mental health condition in their lifetime and many find it difficult to get the support they need.

Louisa Jonas / Texas Public Radio

Instead of swimming and playing soccer at summer camp, some San Antonio kids are doing yoga, learning relaxation skills, and getting music therapy.  The new Camp Wellness at the Ecumenical Center aims to teach children, who may be undergoing stress or are experiencing bullying, about the importance of their mental health and wellness.

Pixabay (Public Domain)

In Texas, approximately one million adults are affected by a serious mental illness – from depression and post-traumatic stress disorder to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and more – and half a million children under age 17 suffer from a severe emotional disturbance.

An Army review concludes that commanders did nothing wrong when they kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers for misconduct after they came back from Iraq or Afghanistan – even though all of those troops had been diagnosed with mental health problems or brain injuries.

The Army's report, ordered by Secretary Eric Fanning, seeks to reassure members of Congress that it's treating wounded soldiers fairly. But senators and military specialists say the report troubles them.

Can Poverty Lead To Mental Illness?

Oct 30, 2016

After a mother killed her four young children and then herself last month in rural China, onlookers quickly pointed to life circumstances.

The family lived in extreme poverty, and bloggers speculated that her inability to escape adversity pushed her over the edge.

Can poverty really cause mental illness?

It's a complex question that is fairly new to science. Despite high rates of both poverty and mental disorders around the world, researchers only started probing the possible links about 25 years ago.

In the spring of 1949 nearly every major newspaper in Texas published an eight-part series called “The Shame of Texas.” It was a shocking and horrid look at the state of mental health care in Texas and exposed them as the nation’s worst mental hospitals.

Since then there have been periodic attempts at reform and fully funding mental health care in Texas – with mixed success.

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