Medicine | Texas Public Radio

Medicine

Heide Couch / 60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs

Starting this October, the Defense Health Agency will take control of all San Antonio-area military medical facilities, including Brooke Army Medical Center, from each of their respective commands.

From Texas Standard:

Over the last two decades, the U.S. has recalled 26,700 medical devices, according to Mexicanos Contra la Corrupción y la Impunidad - a team of journalists in Mexico City working in association with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. The reason these Mexican journalists are on the case is because these recalled or defective medical devices usually end up back in Mexico.

Reporter Miriam Castillo is one of the reporters on that team, and says Mexicans most likely won't know that these devices – which include pacemakers and orthopedic implants for people with damaged bones or joints – could be harmful because the Mexican equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rarely recalls products.

When people take medicine at home, mistakes happen.

Some people end up taking the wrong dose of a medication or the wrong pill. Sometimes, they don't wait long enough before taking a second dose.

Other times, it's a health professional who's at fault. A pharmacist might have dispensed a medication at the wrong concentration, for example.

These kinds of mistakes are on the rise, according to a study published Monday in the journal Clinical Toxicology.

Pixabay (Public Domain)

Coining the term "digital medicine," Dr. Adam Gazzaley's research suggests that playing digital games can aid with brain functions.

On Tuesday, the Texas House’s Public Health Committee heard testimony from people on potential legislation that could change when a person facing a terminal illness could be given experimental drugs. The bill, introduced in the state House last month, would lessen restrictions on medication for compassionate use.

wikicommons

David Williams was diagnosed with brain cancer last fall. The cancer was attacked with radiation and chemotherapy and then removed. But it was back within the year.

Rather than go through the harsh regimen again, doctors from the Cancer Therapy & Research  Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center suggested a new treatment. A treatment that would turn Williams, a 54 year-old Natalia man, into what is essentially, a guinea pig. 

Whatever lands you in the hospital or nursing home also puts you at risk for acquiring an infection, possibly one that's resistant to antibiotic treatment.

Staph infections are common problems in health care facilities, and many Staphylcoccus aureus bacteria are now resistant to drug treatment.

Chances are you've heard of MRSA, which is the kind of staph that isn't susceptible to methicillin, the antibiotic that used to be a silver bullet.

Flickr user Jamelle Bouie (jbouie) / cc

In the first segment:

Could the hospital actually be the third leading cause of death in the country? That is what a recent study estimates  in the Journal of Patient Safety, pegging the number of deaths between 210,000 and 440,000. If this study's findings are accepted -- the former number being closer to 100,000 deaths per year -- they point to a critical issue.  

At San Antonio's Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Marabel Vasquez is monkeying around—but that's her job. She is the chimpanzees' behavioral specialist at the private research facility. She visits with the chimps, provides environmental enrichment and assesses their social dynamics.

On this January morning, it's overcast and 38 degrees, but the chimps brave the cold. Many are outside in their enclosed play area and welcome Marabel with hoots.