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medical research

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to treat a rare blood disorder. It’s the first new treatment for this disease in nearly a decade, and a San Antonio researcher is one of the people behind it.

Kathy West Studios

San Antonio researchers will experiment with older baboons to see if new drugs can help ease the challenges that come with getting older. Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute hope the medicines will reverse cognitive decline and memory problems in older people.


NIH Photo Gallery

The Department of Defense is funding research in San Antonio to see if a new vaccine can prevent birth defects in babies of women exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy. 

 


Mahadevan et al., 2019 / University of Texas at San Antonio

A San Antonio researcher hopes to eventually get 100,000 people to enroll in a first-of-its-kind study on cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s, and anyone who doesn’t mind wearing a fitbit can volunteer.

Nathan Sokul

A pair of Trinity University undergrads who set out to create something to help people take opioid medication with less risk have instead developed a product that has the potential to improve how new medications are tested all over the world.

Gavin Buchanan, 19, and Andrew Aertker, 20,  were in an entrepreneurship program together, and working on a class assignment.

The Alzheimer's Association hopes to determine if lifestyle changes can delay brain changes that lead to cognitive decline.
NIH Image Gallery http://bit.ly/2IEO8D3

The Alzheimer's Association is preparing to launch a study to see if lifestyle changes in older Americans can stave off the development of dementia.

Josh Parks

A Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientist is helping develop a test for the Zika virus that has been called “a lab on a chip.”


Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

In November, a scientist in China claimed he used a tool on the DNA of embryos to design twin girls who were born immune to HIV. That tool left many wondering: How does it alter human genes? Is it OK to alter human genes? Several San Antonio researchers share their thoughts.


Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Updated Jan. 18.

While public health experts are working furiously to quell the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, researchers in San Antonio have made a discovery that might be a key to improving treatment.


Recovery Concepts http://bit.ly/2RNusAB

A small first-in-human trial of a medicine that is a potential game changer in the treatment of age-related diseases like Alzheimer's has shown promise in San Antonio.

 


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