medical marijuana | Texas Public Radio

medical marijuana

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Texas’ Compassionate Use Program (CUP) was first established in 2015. Its initial iteration was one of the country’s most restrictive. 

House Bill 3703 from the 2019 state legislative session expanded the list of qualifying conditions that physicians can use to prescribe medical cannabis. 


Wiki Commons

The Texas Senate unanimously passed legislation expanding the Texas Compassionate Use Program on Wednesday. The legislation is expected to become law, enabling more patients to purchase marijuana-derived CBD oil in Texas.

Epileptic Council

The Texas House advanced a bill Monday that would expand the state’s medical marijuana program. The program, which is one of the most restrictive in the country, allows only patients with intractable epilepsy to be prescribed CBD oil with low levels of the psychoactive ingredient THC.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

The non-psychoactive component of marijuana is the latest craze in alternative medicine. Even Walgreens and CVS plan to sell CBD products. But there's one group that has yet to cash in on the CBD fever: Texas farmers.

Epileptic Council

Texas has one of the most restrictive medical marijuana programs in the country, according experts who track marijuana laws. But some lawmakers from both parties are ready to change that.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

Groups pushing for an expansion of the state’s medical marijuana law joined people pushing decriminalization and total legalization efforts at the State Capitol on Thursday.  

The 400 people gathered in Austin comprised a colorful crowd of diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. But they all shared one objective: reform of the state’s current marijuana laws.

Heather Fazio, director of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, said it has been a “banner year” for marijuana advocacy in Texas.

One November afternoon inside a raised ranch in Rhode Island, Kristal and Chris' 13-year-old son was just getting home from school.

"How's school?" Chris says.

"Bad!" Dylan says. He's a skinny kid with glasses – still small enough for his mom to wrap him in a bear hug if he gets out of control.

He's had a lot of bad days. Dylan's parents review the daily reports his school sends home.

Ryan Poppe

Gov. Greg Abbott shared his views on marijuana use in Texas during Friday night's gubernatorial debate. He mentioned one idea that may have surprised marijuana advocates.


The Cannabis Training University / CC

Ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, Texans will be seeing — and hearing — a lot of  campaign ads. But, on top of the typical election year barrage of political commercials, some rural Texans will also be seeing a very different kind of ad.

 

 

A painkiller prescription could become a ticket for medical marijuana in Illinois. Lawmakers there passed a bill making anyone with a prescription for opioids eligible for its medical cannabis program.

With this move, Illinois joins a growing number of states turning to legal cannabis in the fight against painkiller addiction.

"As we see the horrible damage inflicted by opioid use and misuse, it seems like a very low-cost and low-risk alternative," says state Sen. Don Harmon, a Democrat from Oak Park, Ill., and sponsor of the Senate version of the bill.

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