local music | Texas Public Radio

local music

Dominic Anthony Walsh | Texas Public Radio

The City of San Antonio has less than two months until its August deadline to complete part of its first ever “music strategic plan.” The city has had one year to finish certain steps outlined in the guiding document, which is intended to improve and expand opportunities for the local music industry. 

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Los Nahuatlatos (nä wät lâ tōs) is a group with deep roots to their Xicano-Indigenous heritage, whose mission is to “create original, inspiring and innovative music on a conscious level that people of all ages and backgrounds can enjoy.” They describe their sound as “Xicano roots fusion,” because their music is a combination of different traditional Latino styles.

 

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Demitasse is a two-piece softly sung acoustic group comprised of Erik Sanden and Joe Reyes, both from the art-rock band Buttercup. Equipped with high falsetto harmonies and acoustic driven melodies, the duo sounds like the happier version of Elliott Smith or the heartbroken version of The Beach Boys.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

With the belief that music stems from an “intimacy with one’s self,” the Parallelephants say they’re using music to pioneer a new “sexual renaissance.”

Members Thomie Lazcano, Aldo Lazcano, and Dany Escobar create a soulful atmosphere through their deeply layered tracks. Originally, the group formed when Thomie and Aldo were teenagers and attempted to be pop-punk musicians.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

The Time Enders’ performance is so impressively dead-on to folk music produced in the ‘50s and ‘60s that you might wonder where they parked the time machine. Channeling the lyrical simplicity of cowboy songs and the mellower side of life, Nicholas Spyker and Orlando Gonzales create a timeless sound. Their set captured a moment in the early ‘60s where songs radiated an ethereal beauty and blossomed into the flower-power movement.

 

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

"You want to jam?" was the first message that guitarist Nehemiah “Nemo” Alvarado sent to Kassandra “Kass” Ayala. He discovered her profile on bandmix.com, an online network for connecting local musicians and bands, and immediately knew he had to reach out. Kass remembered being a little freaked out by his message at first, “because his profile didn’t have any photos or recordings. I said ‘yes’ because I didn't have anything else to do.”

Nathan Cone / TPR

Some plane rides seem like they will never end. Especially if the plane ride simultaneously marks the end of one life chapter and the uncertain start of another. On his long plane ride from Las Vegas back to Texas in 2014, Logan Woodyard spent the entirety of his flight trying to figure out what he was going to do, musically, for the next year of his life. Armed with a vague idea of what he wanted, the first thing Logan did ­­once his plane landed was find Stephanie Cardona – his decision seemed like something the male lead of a romantic comedy would do.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio’s music industry generates an estimated $930 million in economic impact, according to a city study that came out last year.

UTSA professor Stan Renard saw that report, which drew data from music venues, bars, music education organizations and nonprofits, and said something was missing.

Oscar Moreno

San Antonio's music industry contributes an estimated $930 million to the local economy, according to a recent study mandated by the City of San Antonio. 


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