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literature

Riverhead Books

In his book "Beneath a Ruthless Sun," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Gilbert King tells a true story of corruption and institutional bigotry.


Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Chicana writer Cherríe Moraga is the author of the literary memoir, “Native Country of the Heart.” It explores not just Moraga’s life, but that of her mother, Elvira.  Elvira was born in 1914. Her father hired 11-year-old Elvira and her siblings as cotton pickers in California. As a young teen, she worked at a Tijuana casino that was frequented by Hollywood stars and mob bosses.

Courtesy

Some politicians paint such a dire picture of the Texas/Mexico border it’s natural to wonder where all this is leading.


San Antonio Book Festival

The San Antonio Book Festival returns in April for a seventh time and with a new executive director: Lilly Gonzalez succeeds festival founder Katy Flato. 

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

On Fronteras:

  • A 12-year-old Mexican-American boy who was shot and killed by a Dallas police officer is honored with a public art project and documentary (0:21).
  • American writer, poet, and translator Margaret Randall joins us to discuss translating the collection “The Oval Portrait: Contemporary Cuban Women Writers and Artists” (4:55).
  • The University of Texas at San Antonio library has recently featured cookbooks created by housekeeping staff. Here’s why (14:21).

Barefoot Books Publishing / http://bit.ly/2JIBiju

On Fronteras:

  • Tackling infant mortality with paternal involvement (0:15).
  • The true story of a father and son’s journey across the U.S.-Mexico border told in a children’s book (14:25).

Contributed Photo

Luis Alberto Urrea was born in Tijuana, Mexico, to a Mexican father and an American mother. The acclaimed author is best known for his novels about the U.S.-Mexico border, including "The Devil's Highway."

On this episode of "Texas Matters," contributor Yvette Benavides talks to Urrea about his latest work, "The House of Broken Angels," which is based on real-life events.


Josue Vazquez

An international evening of dance, music and literature is planned for Wednesday night. Sponsored by Alianza Latinoamericana, the evening starts off with dance--specifically, the Tango. Don't know how to Tango? Josue Vazquez says not a problem.

"We will have a tango lesson--Argentine Tango lesson. My friend Manuel Lobo will be teaching the lesson. We have a large selection of tangos. It will be basic tango for people who never done it. If somebody is there has done it before, we can accommodate them, too."

Hotel Emma

It's a series of gatherings for those who treasure the spoken and written word.  Sherry Kafka Wagner created the gatherings, and they grew out of her love for literature. Because of that, she spent a lifetime buying and reading books. Recently, she gave them all away. 


Texas is known for its writers of almost every genre – but maybe not so much for its writers of horror. And that could be seen as an oversight. The Texas talent pool has it’s dark side. And there is so much about the lone star state that is lurking in the shadows – and haunting the recesses of our minds.

The current leading Texas horror writers are collected in a new anthology called “Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers.”

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