law enforcement | Texas Public Radio

law enforcement

Two men look on at protestors in San Antonio on May 30.
Kathleen Creedon | Texas Public Radio

In times of civil unrest or social upheaval, protests seek to raise awareness for a message or cause in solidarity with others. Crowds of people seeking to alter the status quo march in close proximity, often chanting, shouting and singing -- none of which are conducive to mitigating the spread of COVID-19.


Protesters across the U.S. are descending on city streets to demand justice and systemic change when it comes to racial injustice at the hands of police officers.


Bexar County is seeing the emergence of more specialty courts that target specific populations and offer offenders a rehabilitative path forward.


Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio News

Some local law enforcement and fire units on Thursday practiced the latest technique in responding to a mass school shooting.

Pixa

The Miranda warning guarantees your right as a citizen to an attorney and legal representation if you can't afford one. Does this court-appointed counsel work in the best interest of the accused? Experts from the Texas Indigent Defense Commission, National Legal Aid & Defender Association, and St. Mary's University's Center for Legal and Social Justice speak on "The Source." 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

New legislation filed at the state capitol aims to provide stiffer punishment for those caught targeting police and first responders.  

Following the shooting of San Antonio Police Det. Benjamin Marconi, the city’s police Chief William McManus said that it was obvious, the uniform, not the officer was the target.

Ryan Poppe

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick says nearly 60,000 law enforcement officers are being outfitted with substandard equipment.  Patrick is pushing for an upgrade that he says will save police officers' lives.

David Sleight/ProPublica

A new ProPublica investigation has raised serious questions about the accuracy of roadside drug tests commonly used by Texas law enforcement. The investigation shows that the over-reliance by law enforcement on these tests has resulted in many innocent people pleading guilty.

Ryan E. Poppe

In 2015, the 84th Legislature approved $10 million for the purchase of body cameras through a matching grant program that is overseen by the Governor’s office.  But since taking affect this past September; questions remain among state lawmakers as to when and how the tapes could be released to the public.

Lorne Mataon / Marfa Public Radio

Numbers Up For Central American Minors Trying To Enter U.S.

In the summer of 2014, more than 100,000 Central American children and families were caught trying to enter the US illegally. Those numbers fell after the US asked Mexico to strengthen its southern border. But now there are concerns over the possibility of a renewed surge.

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