journalism | Texas Public Radio

journalism

Verónica G. Cárdenas

The U.S.-Mexico border recently dominated news headlines, from reports on overcrowded detention facilities to the “Stay in Mexico” policy. Two journalists say the region is more complex and culturally rich than what is portrayed in mainstream media

Then, young people living in San Antonio public housing get an education in art and culture in a printmaking summer workforce session.

Jane Pelley

Scott Pelley has reported on the biggest stories of the last 30 years as a 60 Minutes correspondent and former CBS news anchor.


Lynda Gonzalez/KUT

With tragedies and disasters dominating media coverage nationwide, what impact does frequent exposure to traumatic events have on people covering the news, as well as those who watch or read it? 


Courtesy The National Press Club

Outside of conflict zones, Mexico was the most dangerous place for journalists in 2017.

The number of journalists killed in Mexico because of their reporting has "reached a historical high," according to a report by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Wikipedia http://bit.ly/2z8m8Bw


Last December Diane Rehm signed off for the last time on NPR. It was the final broadcast for her self-titled program that for nearly 40 years provided public radio listeners civil conversations about the most controversial news stories of the day. The nation's power brokers and policy shapers sat across from Rehm, taking questions from her and her listeners.

From Texas Standard:

"Journalism in the age of Trump" is more than just a very popular title right now for academic symposia. The media industry has been doing a lot of self-examination under a new presidential administration that's changing the rules of engagement.

theenmoy on Flickr http://bit.ly/2jo60VW

Texas Supreme Court decisions in 2015 effectively curtailed access to public records held by private entities doing business with the government.

Deborah Knapp

Emmy-award winning anchor Deborah Knapp is a familiar face for viewers in San Antonio. She recently celebrated 30 years of  not only reporting on-air, but also at the same TV news station: KENS 5.

From covering Columbine to Hurricane Katrina and supporting local causes, Knapp understands community reporting and has much more to offer San Antonio. What's next for Deborah Knapp?

Guest: Deborah Knapp, Emmy award-winning anchor at KENS 5 San Antonio

Photo by Tamir Kalifa / The Texas Tribune

It was a surprise when a Houston Grand Jury came back with indictments not for Planned Parenthood - who were being investigated for selling fetal tissue - but instead for two individuals responsible for the secret videos that threw the issue into the national spotlight.

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