Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Immigration

Big white tent complexes in two Texas border towns are drawing attention. These are temporary courtrooms, the latest effort by the Trump administration to more quickly work through thousands of migrant asylum cases.


Abbie Fentress Swanson | Harvest Public Media

Physical pain, post-traumatic stress and inconsolable crying are just some of the experiences of migrant children highlighted in a report out this month from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General. 

Last August and September, investigators visited 45 facilities funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement, or ORR, including 20 facilities in Texas. They interviewed about 100 mental health clinicians who worked with the children detained there.

Richard Loria for Texas Public Radio

U.S. officials have sent back to Mexico more than 30,000 asylum-seeking migrants to wait for their immigration court dates. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico program. Pregnant women are among some of the people sent back. But one attorney from the Rio Grande Valley pushed back at the policy. She tried to get her client paroled and back into Texas.


Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

It's been five months since San Antonio opened its Migrant Resource Center downtown, and in that time tens of thousands of asylum-seekers have spent time in San Antonio before moving on to their final destinations. 


A young girl at a migrant shelter in Nuevo Laredo.
Reynaldo Leaños Jr. | Texas Public Radio

Monday on "The Source" -- Who are the people coming to the U.S. for asylum? What drives them to leave their homes and what are they finding when they arrive at the Southern border?


Scott Nicol / Sierra Club Borderlands Team

Last week the Trump administration issued a strict new policy that requires migrants to first apply for asylum in a country they passed through en route to the United States, before applying for asylum in the U.S. The rule already faces legal challenges.

  

Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/2JrNBle

Thousands of migrant children and adults are currently subject to dangerous overcrowding, unsanitary conditions and prolonged internment at U.S. detention facilities.


The Trump administration is seeking to fine some immigrants, who are in the United States illegally, hundreds of thousands of dollars for failing to take steps to leave after being ordered to do so, according to government documents obtained by NPR.

The Department of Homeland Security sent out a batch of notices across the country to targeted individuals ordering them to pay fines of up to nearly $500,000 for "failing to depart the U.S. as previously agreed," among other factors.

Vigils are being held in the Rio Grande Valley for a Salvadoran father and daughter who died last week as they crossed the Rio Grande.

The bodies of Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his daughter Angie Valeria were photographed, face down, after they drowned trying to make it to the U.S.

Among the many who reacted to the photo is Greisa Martinez. She and her family crossed the same river to get the U.S. 22 years ago. She was 8 years old.

This week, we’ve continued to see the disturbing images coming from the detention centers on the southern border. The families keep making the journey from their home countries to the US/Mexico border, risking family separation—and more. 

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