Immigration | Texas Public Radio

Immigration

Roberto Martinez

Almost overnight, "flatten the curve" became a national motto. This week on Petrie Dish, TPR's weekly podcast about the coronavirus, we unpack the origins of that phrase with a public health expert who helped popularize it. And, we hear from reporters across Texas about some of the negative consequences of quarantine, from a spike in domestic violence reports to the relocation of migrants in camps along the U.S.-Mexico border. 

A new report by Physicians for Human Rights documents evidence of lasting psychological harm for migrant children and parents subjected to the Trump Administration's family separation policy, which was intended to dissuade migration to the nation's southern border.


Families Fear Census Data Could Be Used To Find Undocumented Immigrants, Survey Shows

Feb 20, 2020
A U.S. Census worker goes door to door.
U.S. Census Bureau

New research shows low-income and immigrant communities are worried the 2020 Census could be used to target undocumented people, indicating a high likelihood of an undercount. 

File Photo| Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued an emergency stay late Monday night, blocking the deportation of a 5-year-old Guatemalan boy until the court can hear his case.

The move puts a hold on an earlier ruling, which would have allowed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to deport the boy and his family.

Origami cranes hang on a fence outside the South Texas family detention center in Dilley, Texas March 30, 2019.
File Photo | Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

Attorneys for a Guatemalan woman detained at a detention center in Dilley, Texas, are in court Monday to ask a judge to order U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement to provide further medical care for her 5-year-old son.

The Trump administration has expanded its new asylum claim review program to the Rio Grande Valley.

The Prompt Asylum Claim Review program, or PACR, has been in effect in El Paso since October.

Migrants in the PACR program are kept in U.S. Customs and Border Protection facilities instead of detention centers run by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

It's estimated that in the last 10 years about 700 migrants died crossing the desert in Brooks County. This is ground zero of a South Texas humanitarian crisis where migrants risk death in order to enter the U.S. without legal authorization. What happens to the human remains of those who don’t make it? There is an effort to identify those bodies and reunite the remains with families.


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Every year, an untold number of migrants attempt to cross the U.S. southern border without government authorization. The flow of humanity is persistent and undeterred. Even with the threat of imprisonment or death they still come.


Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

A line snaked around the building that houses immigration court in downtown San Antonio early Friday morning. More than 100 people showed up for a court date that was set five years ago, then postponed. These migrants didn’t get the message. 

Lauren Markham is a writer and reporter based in Berkeley, Calif. Her work has been featured on multiple outlets, including The Guardian, Harper’s, Orion, Guernica, VICE, Pacific Standard, The New Yorker.com and VQR, where she is a contributing editor.
Ben Guccciardi

Senior White House adviser Stephen Miller was recently exposed of sending emails to the far-right media outlet, Breibart, in which he recommended the website write about the 1973 French novel, “The Camp of the Saints.” The controversial novel pushes the theory that minorities are replacing and ultimately destroying white civilization — “the great replacement” myth.

These are the same myths writer and journalist Lauren Markham has aimed to tackle throughout her writing. She has worked with refugees and immigrants for over a decade and has written about migration stories and migration myths.


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