Immigrants | Texas Public Radio

Immigrants

In his address to Congress last week, President Trump said this about the kinds of people his immigration agents are singling out for deportation:

"We are removing gang members, drug dealers and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak."

Then why, some Houstonians are asking, did immigration agents target Piro Garcia, the owner of two popular taco trucks on the city's Southside?

In early December, Joann Lee and her family were crossing the street in front of The Los Angeles County Museum of Art. A white van was stopped at the light. Out of nowhere, Lee says, the driver of the van, a white woman, said to Lee's 7-year-old daughter, "You are the most disgusting girl in the whole world. Your family killed my family so you could enjoy a day at the museum."

Why Are Mexicans Leaving the U.S. in Droves?

Mar 1, 2017

From Texas Standard: 

Workers at the Mexican Consulate in Austin are hustling and bustling. Some are handing out passports, others are helping people fill out the forms they need to move their furnishings from the United States to Mexico.

An increase in immigration enforcement and proposed policies from President Donald Trump may be taking a toll on businesses that rely on an immigrant workforce. Some in Austin's construction community say undocumented workers don’t feel safe reporting to work.

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared closely divided Wednesday as it tried to figure out whether immigrants can be detained indefinitely without a chance to persuade a neutral judge that they are entitled to temporary release.

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Standard explores what it means to be American as part of the NPR series "A Nation Engaged."

After the surge of child migrants to the U.S. from Central America in 2014, there was a scramble to find lawyers to represent more than 10,000 kids who faced deportation hearings. Two years later, federal immigration records show that half of the unaccompanied children still don’t have legal representations.

A lawsuit moving through the courts in Washington State aims to change that. Jude Joffe-Block from the Fronteras Desk at KJZZ in Phoenix reports.

From Texas StandardData from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection show apprehensions of families and unaccompanied minors crossing the Texas-Mexico border has hit levels not seen since the 2014 border surge. There were more than 7,100 such cases in the Rio Grande sector last month alone.

Summer is the time we usually see spikes in illegal border crossings, so what does this mean for the coming season?


U.S. churches are again defying federal immigration authorities. Across the country, a handful of congregations are opening their doors to offer safe haven to Central American immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally and are under deportation orders.

The new sanctuary movement echoes an earlier civil disobedience campaign by churches in the 1980s.

The newest church in America to openly challenge federal immigration laws is St. Andrew's Presbyterian in Austin, Texas. Ten days ago, the congregation took in Hilda and Ivan Ramirez, a Guatemalan mother and her 9-year-old son.

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