Immigrants | Texas Public Radio

Immigrants

Photos via Getty Images for Undocumented by John Moore, published by powerHouse Books

This week on Fronteras:

One of the most famous photographs to illustrate the zero-tolerance immigration policy by the Trump administration is by photographer John Moore. Moore joined us on Fronteras to discuss the month prior to taking that famous photo.


A federal court in San Diego has given the government until July 26 to reunite thousands of children with their parents. It has been a chaotic, much disputed process, but a process that is undeniably underway. Here are five questions about family reunification answered:

1. When did family separations start?

From Texas Standard.

The American Civil Liberties Union has released a report based on some 30,000 pages of internal records from the Department of Homeland Security between 2009 to 2014, obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. What they’ve found is what they call “the pervasive abuse and neglect of unaccompanied immigrant children detained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.”

From Texas Standard.

In an effort to control its borders, the U.S. has been unequivocal in declaring what will happen to those who illegally immigrate to the U.S. with underage kids in tow – you may be be separated from your kids. It’s supposed to be a deterrent. In the past, parents with children were not routinely prosecuted for illegally crossing the border. But that’s changed, and now kids are being separated from their parents.

BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • A farmworker searches for migrants who go missing while crossing the border.
  • The demand for Mayan interpreters in the U.S. is on the rise (4:27).
  • The emotional health of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipients who face losing their special status in March (10:42).


When Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in August, Tosha Atibu and her husband Atibu Ty Ty were asleep in their home with their children. A neighbor woke them up to tell them the water was rushing up the street.

"It was really scary situation. ... the water was coming in from the front yard, from the back yard, flooding everywhere. We had to act immediately," Tosha Atibu says.

U.S. Border Patrol

An effort is being made by the American Civil Liberties Union, the Workers Defense Action Fund and a San Antonio Congressman to get a 10-year-old undocumented immigrant with Cerebral Palsy released back to her family.

Rosa Maria Hernandez was being transported from Laredo to a Corpus Christi hospital for gall bladder surgery this week. They were stopped at a border patrol check point, East of Laredo. From there, agents escorted her to the hospital and waited for her release before taking her to an Office of Refugee Resettlement shelter in San Antonio.

From Texas Standard:

San Antonio federal judge ruled last week that the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office violated the rights of a Mexican citizen when he was held in jail on an immigration detainer after his criminal charges were dismissed.

From Texas Standard:

Austin Mayor Steve Adler released a letter yesterday addressed to “All Good People in the World” following two U.S. Senators’ call for South by Southwest to relocate their annual festival out of Texas until Senate Bill 4 is repealed or overturned by the courts.

Along a barren dirt road, Border Patrol agents spot a mother and son, carrying nothing as they walk along the river's edge. The sun beats down on them as the patrol car pulls up.

"Where are you from?" Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Marlene Castro asks the mother. "How much did you pay to get here?"

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