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immigrant detention

The number of migrants taken into custody after crossing the southern border declined for the fourth consecutive month, according to new figures released by the Trump administration.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 3:34 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has announced it is ending a federal court agreement that limits how long migrant families with children can be detained.

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan outlined the new policy Wednesday, which replaces the Flores settlement agreement.

That's been a longtime target of immigration hard-liners in the Trump administration, who contend the settlement has acted as a lure to families in Central America.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan announced changes just this morning to how long government can detain migrant children. Here he is.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Customs and Border Protection officials are denying that a Border Patrol agent asked a 3-year-old girl to choose which of her parents would be sent back to Mexico.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET Monday

The Trump administration's immigration policies have drawn condemnation, but increasingly the criticism has also turned to a web of companies that are part of the multibillion-dollar industry that runs detention facilities housing tens of thousands of migrants around the country.

Businesses that supply goods and services to support those detention centers face increasing public and political scrutiny from investors, employees and activists.

Central American women and children seeking asylum in the U.S. often encounter a whole other level of trauma along their voyage. A new study documents the experiences previously detained women faced and the professionals who work with them.

Then, a recent UTSA graduate shares his path of pursuing a bachelor's degree after his mother was unexpectedly deported.


From Texas Standard:

Tuesday, after five years of legal wrangling, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 5-4 decision in a challenge to rules allowing the federal government to detain immigrants with criminal convictions, even if they entered the U.S. lawfully, and even after they have served their time. The decision prevents such an immigrant from appealing a detention decision, and could allow indefinite detention.

Frederick Murphy / CDC/ Erskine. L. Palmer, Ph.D.; M. L. Martin

The Guatemalan boy who died in U.S. custody on Christmas Eve had the flu. The New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator has confirmed 8-year-old Felipe Gomez Alonzo tested positive for Influenza B, though his precise cause of death has not been officially determined.


From Texas Standard:

The border, the wall, the immigration issue – they're all front and center right now in Washington, as they have been almost every day of 2018.

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