Illegal immigration | Texas Public Radio

Illegal immigration

Kino Lorber

In the 1970s, Mexico made a bet with itself that didn’t pay off. Borrowing heavily against future oil revenues, the country’s economy tanked when the price of oil dropped. As a result, the 1970s and early 1980s might be considered the beginning of the boom in illegal immigration to the United States, as workers looked for a better life north of the Rio Grande.

From Texas Standard:

On Friday, President Donald Trump tweeted that he would close some or all of the U.S. border with Mexico this week “[i]f Mexico doesn’t immediately stop ALL illegal immigration.” There are over 40 U.S.-Mexico border crossings and more than 300 ports of entry, and experts predict their closure would affect more than $1.7 billion worth of commerce every day. Areas along the U.S.-Mexico border would experience the most direct impact, but ripple effects could spread beyond the region.

From Texas Standard:

Pew Research Center recently published a report showing how a majority of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. live in one of 20 metropolitan areas. But there was another statistic within the report that was important in its own right: The number of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. has gone down over the last decade. As of 2016, Pew estimates there were about 10.7 million, compared to about 12.2 million in 2007.

Mark Hugo Lopez is director of global migration and demography at Pew Research, and says there's been a large decline in unauthorized immigrants from Mexico, in particular. At the same time, there's been an increase of unauthorized immigrants from other countries, whom Lopez says have most likely overstayed their visas.

There appears to be another surge at the southern border, and the most recent reports of number of families looking to gain unauthorized entry into the United States are raising eyebrows. They've certainly inspired a novelist in his latest work.

More than 76,000 migrants crossed the border without authorization in February. That's an 11-year high.

Kevin K. McAlleenan is the commissioner of Customs and Border Protection.

Valeria Luiselli’s 2017 book “Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions”  is an accounting of the author’s time working as an immigration courtroom interpreter in New York City.  Like many of us, she was preoccupied with the border surge that occurred in 2014 and perplexed at the plight of the unaccompanied children, some 80,000, who made the perilous journey from the violence and despair of their home countries in Central America.  

At least six immigrant detainees on a hunger strike have been force-fed through nasal tubes by immigration authorities, while nine other asylum-seekers are starving themselves, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed on Thursday.

Eleven of the detainees refusing food, some for more than a month, are in custody at the El Paso Processing Center. Four others are in ICE detentions centers across the country: one each in Miami, Phoenix, San Diego and San Francisco.

Homeland Security agents created a fake university in Michigan to attract foreign nationals who wanted to use student status to extend U.S. visa privileges, according to a federal indictment unsealed Wednesday. The University of Farmington didn't have any professors or hold any classes — but that didn't matter to "students" who used the sham school to stay in the U.S. illegally, the government says.

Most undocumented immigrants didn't enter this country through Tijuana, where news cameras have captured images of thousands of immigrants seeking refuge during recent months.

And they didn't enter near the border town of McAllen, Texas, which the president visited Thursday during the 20th day of a partial government shutdown fought over constructing additional barriers on the Southern border.

President Trump traveled to a Border Patrol station in McAllen, Texas, today, continuing on his campaign to drum up support for a $5.7 billion border wall. The visit came after weeks of Congressional debate about border security that has resulted in a partial government shutdown.

10.27.18
David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

It was 3 a.m. Saturday, and Bertalina shivered at the San Antonio Greyhound Bus Station. She and her son were released hours ago from a border patrol holding facility in McAllen and then sent to San Antonio.

Bertalina was one of several thousand asylum seekers suddenly released by U.S. immigration officials. As a caravan of Central Americans makes its way to the U.S. border, San Antonio will continue to see a sudden surge in the number of immigrants, testing the limits of local non-profits to provide assistance.

 


Pages