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Ice

At least six immigrant detainees on a hunger strike have been force-fed through nasal tubes by immigration authorities, while nine other asylum-seekers are starving themselves, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed on Thursday.

Eleven of the detainees refusing food, some for more than a month, are in custody at the El Paso Processing Center. Four others are in ICE detentions centers across the country: one each in Miami, Phoenix, San Diego and San Francisco.

10.27.18
David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

It’s 3 a.m. Saturday and Bertalina is shivering at the San Antonio Greyhound Bus Station. She and her son were released hours ago from a border patrol holding facility in McAllen and then sent to San Antonio.

Bertalina is one of several thousand asylum seekers suddenly released by U.S. immigration. And as a caravan of Central Americans makes its way to the U.S. border, San Antonio will continue to see a sudden surge in the number of immigrants, testing the limits of local non-profits to provide assistance.

 


Immigration and Customs Enforcement last weekend began a targeted deportation of Central Americans who are in the country illegally. That includes families in Texas.

Thousands of Central American women and children fleeing violence have been released from family detention centers in the last 18 months. But there aren't enough community and legal services to help them make their cases for asylum. 

That’s according to Johnathan Ryan, executive director of the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, RAICES.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

SAN ANTONIO — About 250 immigrant children were given an adult dose of a hepatitis A vaccine at a Texas detention facility where they were being held with their mothers, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

The vaccines were administered this week, but none of the children has been hospitalized or had any adverse reactions, ICE officials said Saturday.

ICE spokesman Richard Rocha said health care professionals would monitor the children over the next five days for any potential side effects, though none are expected.

The White House

HOUSTON — The U.S. government says it “erroneously” awarded three-year work permits to 2,000 people under President Barack Obama's executive immigration action after a judge had put the plan on hold.

The revelation is the second time the federal government has had to clarify whether part of the immigration plan had been implemented after a court order that put it on hold.

In a court document filed Thursday, the Justice Department said that U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services discovered that about 2,000 individuals had been mistakenly sent three-year work authorizations after U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen in Brownsville, Texas, issued a preliminary injunction on Feb. 16 that temporarily blocked the immigration action.

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