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hurricane

Robin Rokobauer doesn't like to chance it. When there's a hurricane, she almost always evacuates.

Rokobauer lives in Cocoa Beach, Fla., on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the 153-mile-long Indian River Lagoon. Her mother is 93.

"She's got to have flushing toilets," Rokobauer says of her mother. "She's got to have fresh water. She's just got some physical needs that require that."

NOAA

Hurricane Preparedness Week is May 5 to May 11, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency encouraged Texans to begin or review their plans for enduring bad weather, flooding and, if necessary, evacuation.

Bob Allen / NASA

The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System will fly for another 19 months. NASA decided to extend the mission because the project provides fresh insight into forecasting hurricane tracks and, more importantly, hurricane intensity. That insight may help save lives.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Hurricane Florence made landfall Friday morning in North Carolina. While people along large swathes of the Eastern Seaboard have been dreading the storm for days, you can say one thing: it arrived right on time.

We are smack-dab in the middle of Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30. Nearly all tropical storm activity in the Atlantic basin occurs between those dates.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Last August, Hurricane Harvey's impact on Houston and the Gulf Coast showed the devastating power of a Category 4 hurricane, costing an estimated $125 billion in damage and taking the lives of at least 88 Texans. 

Credit: Wikicommons http://bit.ly/1CPNiYT

On This episode of "Texas Matters"

  • Racial bias in Texas school districts' discipline and how reform efforts are dropped by the Trump administration.
  • Emergency preparedness items are tax free for the weekend (15:05).
  • The biggest little race in Texas is a .5K for a good cause (19:50).


From Texas Standard.

We’ve reached a meaningful marker since Hurricane Harvey battered many communities in Texas – it’s been six months now since the storm. The recovery effort was supposed to be a model in streamlining, but now we know it’s been kind of a tangled mess.

We’ve brought you the voices of city leaders and Texas residents who say getting back on their feet after Harvey has been very hard and the process of getting help from federal and state officials has been slow.

Before it got cold this winter, it was warm. Very warm. In fact, new data out Monday shows 2017 was the third warmest year recorded in the lower 48 states.

And it was also a smackdown year for weather disasters: 16 weather events each broke the billion-dollar barrier.

First, the heat. Last year was 2.6 degrees F warmer than the average year during the 20th century.

From Texas Standard.

What can we learn from hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria? To answer that question, and to facilitate planning for future storms, seven universities in Florida, Louisiana and Texas are pooling their money to put together what could be a first-of-its-kind center for hurricane research.

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