HPV | Texas Public Radio

HPV

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The Food and Drug Administration has approved an HPV vaccine for men and women from the ages of 27 to 45, potentially protecting another generation of people from the cancer-causing virus.

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Childhood cancer survivors are at a much greater risk of developing HPV-related cancer than the general population, yet far less likely to get vaccinated.  


Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio has the lowest rate of HPV vaccinated children of any major city in Texas, but a cervical cancer survivor is trying to change that by telling her story.

Each year, about 31,000 men and women in the U.S. are diagnosed with a cancer caused by an infection from the human papillomavirus, or HPV. It's the most common sexually transmitted virus and infection in the U.S.

In women, HPV infection can lead to cervical cancer, which leads to about 4,000 deaths per year. In men, it can cause penile cancer. HPV also causes some cases of oral cancer, cancer of the anus and genital warts.

You'd think that a vaccine that protects people against more than a half dozen types of cancer would have patients lining up to get it. But the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which can prevent roughly 90 percent of all cervical cancers as well as other cancers and sexually transmitted infections caused by the virus, has faced an uphill climb since its introduction more than a decade ago.

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