homelessness | Texas Public Radio

homelessness

The VA sanctioned encampment provides basic services to homeless veterans amid the COVID-19 pandemic. It's drawn mixed reactions from homeless advocates.

From Texas Standard:

Texas has a statewide suspension on most eviction cases until April 30. Some Texas counties have gone beyond that, but Texas Tenant's Union Executive Director Sandy Rollins worries it's not enough.

After being laid off or furloughed in response to the outbreak, millions of Americans are struggling to make rent or monthly mortgage payments. What's being done to help people facing housing insecurity and shore up real estate markets amid the coronavirus crisis?


The Washington Post

There are nearly 26,000 people experiencing homelessness in Texas. With limited or no access to everyday hygiene products or information on how to protect themselves from contagion, this population is at a high risk for COVID-19. A Washington Post reporter recently visited one of the largest homeless shelters in the country to profile a worker putting herself on the frontline to help this vulnerable population.

Then, two border communities have conflicting public responses on how to control the spread of the coronavirus in the shared region.

From Texas Standard:

For some, Austin doesn’t feel like the relaxed, artsy city they knew a couple decades ago. The city’s population has exploded in recent years, and with that has come big-city problems.

When the icy wind blows off the Spokane River, the temperature can routinely plunge below zero on this city's worn streets near downtown and the I-90 freeway. Trying to survive without shelter out here is almost impossible.

Just ask Mariah Hodges.

"The first night I came here I was almost frozen to the sidewalk," Hodges says.

As the bells of St. Peter's Basilica ring out from the Vatican on a chilly January evening, a few people huddled in shabby clothes stand a few yards from the colonnade encircling St. Peter's Square.

They are waiting to enter the Palazzo Migliori, a 19th century palace just behind the square.

One of them is Livia, an Italian woman in her 60s. After having slept on Rome's streets for months, she has been spending nights since early December in what has become known as the "Palace of the Poor."

Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

Every year at the end of January, volunteers in cities across the country spend a single night counting the number of people experiencing homelessness. The information collected is used to better understand what causes homelessness and get a snapshot of how many people may be living on the streets.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The day before Ashley Baker turned 16 years old, she moved into a Dallas motel with her mom. They were newly homeless.

Sandy, Ashley's mother, then 44, had just left a troubled marriage, scraped together what money she could and left home with Ashley.

For the next two and a half years, they were homeless. They recounted the challenges they faced during a recent StoryCorps interview in Dallas.

"One of the first places that we lived was [an] InTown Suites Hotel," said Sandy, now 54. "And there was nothing sweet about it. It was crazy bad."

Pages